Dispatches from the Creation Wars

Genie Scott on the BBC

For those who might be interested, the BBC has an audio interview with Genie Scott of the National Center for Science Education on their webpage. There’s also a disturbing picture of her with Ken Ham. Then again, any picture with Ken Ham in is disturbing.

Comments

  1. #1 keiths
    March 29, 2007

    I wonder if they shook hands. Shouldn’t that have resulted in some kind of matter/anti-matter annihilation?

  2. #2 Kristine
    March 29, 2007

    All these documentaries made in Britain about what is going on in the United States.

    Why aren’t these shows being produced in the United States? Are TV execs afraid to air the controversy over the “controversy?” (Yes.)

  3. #3 tacitus
    March 29, 2007

    Well, it is a radio show, and radio is pretty much dead as a documentary medium in the US. (NPR does some sterling work, but can’t come close to the quality and quantity of programming the BBC does in this area.)

    Fortunately, through the wonders of the Intertubes, a large chunk of the Beeb’s talk radio output is available for free online:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/

    Most shows are online for a week after they are aired, but many of the science and documentary shows keep their archives online for much longer.

  4. #4 Poly
    March 29, 2007

    All these documentaries made in Britain about what is going on in the United States.

    I guess you don’t watch NOVA on PBS. I can’t say enough good things about this series. Their shows are consistently well done and no ‘fake science’.

    C-SPAN has scientists and science writers on from time-to-time – sometimes in its typical talking-head format and sometimes on BookTV. IIRC, a few months ago they had Michael Shermer debating Jonathan Wells about ID in some venue. I wouldn’t exactly call it riveting television, but they do have them on.

  5. #5 grasshopper
    March 29, 2007

    I wonder if they shook hands. Shouldn’t that have resulted in some kind of matter/anti-matter annihilation?

    Or, to put a different spin on it, charm meets strange.

  6. #6 Ginger Yellow
    March 29, 2007

    BBC TV’s science coverage – Attenborough aside – is pretty terrible, actually. The flagship science programme, Horizon, has had its budget and scheduling cut back dramatically since its heyday in the 80s and is now little more than a joke. This week’s programme summary: “Professor Lesley Regan is on a mission to fill her bathroom cabinet with cosmetics that actually work”. Even the programmes that focus on weighty scientific issues or controversies spend about 10 minutes on the actual science and 50 minutes on narrative filler. You do get the occasional decent documentary that isn’t about wildlife, but they’re one offs.

  7. #7 Nebogipfel
    March 30, 2007

    Horizon did a good episode on the Dover trial, IIRC. But you’re right that the BBC is slowly but surely dumbing down. They used to assume that the viewer was not stupid, but just ignorant of the subject under discussion, and would try and explain it in words containing three or more syllables. But now it’s assumed that the viewer *is* stupid, and has the attention span of a goldfish.

    Oh, and this coming Sunday, there’s a programme on BBC2 about Jim Phelps, called “The Most Hated Family In America”.

  8. #8 Jim Lippard
    March 31, 2007

    Fred Phelps, you mean…

  9. #9 Nebogipfel
    April 4, 2007

    Whoops, yes, I did mean Fred. I can only plead being a Brit in my defence. But hopefully Fred’s Mission is also Impossible… ;-)