Effect Measure

Archives for April, 2008

A viral infection with serious public health consequences occurred in Canada on January with little publicity:

Important new flu paper in Cell: part II

In our previous post we set the stage for discussing the results of a significant new paper by Imai et al. and colleagues on the mechanism of lung damage from diverse pathogens, including SARS, bird flu H5N1, 1918 H1N1 flu, inhalational anthrax and Monkeypox. If this work is verified it is a major step forward…

Better than roadkill

It’s kind of strange when suddenly there are a lot of articles on growing meat in a vat (it’s probably because there was a recent conference in Norway on the topic). Even we posted on it last week and today the New York Times tells us that PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals…

Important new flu paper in Cell: part I

The cells of your body don’t just sit there, unmindful of what is going on around them. They have to respond to things, even cooperate with other cells to get things done for the common good. Humans do the same thing. We’ve developed a system of signaling to each other using an intricate vocal system,…

“Oh, what a tangled web we weave, when first we practice to deceive pollute.” I know it doesn’t rhyme. But the tangled web is real:

There’s an epidemic of a viral disease in Florida, although you wouldn’t know it unless you were a vegetable or a farmer:

Disease mongering

The National Post recently had an interesting article on “disease mongering,” an article I largely agreed with. The major point was that fostering a fear of “germs,” promoting the idea that following medical advice, especially advice involving “taking your pills,” and the very definition of who is diseased and who is not has a suspiciously…

This being a public health blog and all, we thought an emphasis on prevention was appropriate. Here’s how to practice damnation hygiene:

It’s in the air

Every once in a while Scienceblogs (through its publisher, Seed Magazine) gets a question from a reader that is circulated to see if one or more of the bloggers wants to take a crack at answering it. Recently a 9 year old wanted to know what is in the air we breathe (chemically speaking). On…

The occupational disease in slaughterhouse workers who extract pig brains using compressed air is growing in number. It is still small because this process seems to be uncommon. We first discussed it last December when there were 11 cases and its origin was uncertain. It didn’t have an official name, although it was identified as…