Effect Measure

Archives for January, 2010

E. coli rides the wave

I’m fully immersed in writing a big grant proposal so I have even less time for blogging and reading blogs than usual, but that doesn’t mean I have no time. Along with my colleagues I’ve been working on this beast for 9 months, but now with only 3 months to go before the deadline it’s…

It was some time after the pandemics of 1957 and 1968 that we were able to judge their severity and it will likely be some time after this one has finally burned itself out, most likely to become “just another” seasonal flu, that we will be able to gauge the 2009 swine flu pandemic. A…

In my regular science trawling I noticed a fascinating paper in Nature (epub ahead of print) that I haven’t seen anything about in the news. It seems to me it’s worth a discussion, if for no other reason than it uses a relatively new approach, small interfering RNA (siRNA), to dissect the functions in the…

Well may the world go, when I’m far away

Every two years the US National Science Board does an analysis of how the country is doing on research and development (R&D). While an important measure of the ability to innovate and compete in a highly competitive and globalized world, I have a hard time getting excited about how this is being portrayed as a…

Work and home

An interesting sounding paper just appeared in the December 2009 issue of the journal American Sociological Review but we don’t have time to read it. So I’ll just tell you what the press release says:

U.S., Hungary, 2010, 1989, 1956

Martin Luther King’s birthday is an official holiday in the US, but King’s example of non-violent resistance is not a US idea. So once again we have decided this non-traditional version of We Shall Overcome is appropriate. I’ve heard and sung this in churches, union halls, in the streets and in concerts for four decades…

Many years ago we had a terrific carpenter build stairs in our old house using a technique called housed stringer construction. This guy was fairly young but a skilled wood worker. He was also missing several fingers on his right hand. Table saw.

Another swine flu virus

There is an old vaudeville joke where a man goes to the doctor complaining about pain in his arm: Doctor: Have you ever had it before? Man: Yes, once before. Doctor: Well, you have it again. CDC reported on their weekly FluView website on Friday that the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) reported to…

Alas, poor Edward. I knew him well:

[Previous installments: here, here, here, here, here] After a detour through the meaning of causation and the need to find a substitute for what can’t, in principle, be observed (the counterfactual), we are now ready to consider what many of you might have thought would be the starting point, randomization. It’s a surprisingly difficult topic…