Epidemiology

Effect Measure

Category archives for Epidemiology

On the surface the story in Wired made perfect sense: Twin Study Deepens Multiple Sclerosis Mystery. It is about a new study from the National Center for Genome Resources that compared the genetic endowments of three sets of identical twins, one each of which contracted multiple sclerosis (MS), the other didn’t. This was a full…

This week Canadian public health researchers published the long awaited paper on possible association between vaccination for seasonal influenza the previous flu season and risk of having a medically diagnosed infection with pandemic influenza during the first wave of infections (April to July) just as that season was ending. When preliminary results were first announced…

John Snow

Yesterday I gave a nod to an important epidemiologist, the late Alice Stewart. I’m old enough to have known her, but not old enough to know the most famous epidemiologist of all — indeed sometimes called the “Father of Epidemiology” — Dr. John Snow. Snow is also claimed as the “Father of Anesthesiology” because he…

Alice Stewart

If you aren’t an epidemiologist of a certain age — or even if you are — you’ve probably not heard of Alice Stewart. Alice was one of England’s premier epidemiologists in the mid to late 20th century, but I didn’t meet her until she was in her 80s. At the time she could still bound…

Flu in hospital workers

The AMA just took over a journal called Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. In fact they proudly announced they were the exclusive publisher and distributor of the journal, formerly published by Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. I wouldn’t even know about it except it was in connection with a press release of an article likely…

Blood transfusions and pandemic flu

As predicted, the pandemic of 2009 is beginning to yield more data, some of it directly applicable to pressing practical questions. The answers are still preliminary, and, as with all science, subject to revision. But it’s what we have at the moment, and a letter that just appeared in the CDC sponsored journal Emerging Infectious…

If you check the blog for tomorrow’s Sunday Sermonette, it will be an hour earlier, astronomically speaking. That’s because in the US the clocks are shifted forward by an hour for “Day Light Savings Time,” starting at 2 a.m. tomorrow morning (before the Sermonette goes up). The time shift will last until November 7, next…

Flu deaths in children

Two days ago I went with my daughter to the pediatrician to check out her 20 month old who had a fever and rash. Viral origin, probably. Also an ear infection. Pretty much par for the course at this time of year. But lots of little ones and their older sibs weren’t so lucky this…

We still don’t know if we are experiencing a lull in flu or the virus has burned itself out for the season, but it’s as good a time as any to reflect a bit on where we’ve been and where we still need to go. Being otherwise occupied (I’m sure you are sick of hearing…

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Yet another cell phone and disease story, and while this one is on the “good news” side, it doesn’t reassure me: