Hospitals

Effect Measure

Category archives for Hospitals

When I was young (high school, college) I had a variety of jobs, including golf caddy (cured me of golf for the rest of my life; there were no carts, just an 11 year old lugging two bags with 16 clubs over 18 holes) and paper boy (4 am on Sundays hauling 80 huge Sunday…

Flu in hospital workers

The AMA just took over a journal called Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. In fact they proudly announced they were the exclusive publisher and distributor of the journal, formerly published by Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins. I wouldn’t even know about it except it was in connection with a press release of an article likely…

Nursing homes (Long Term Care Facilities, LTCFs) are a favorite hunting ground for respiratory viruses, including flu. They are open to the general community, where visitors and employees mingle freely with the residents. The residents are usually of an advanced age, have other sicknesses that make them vulnerable and often have less active immune defenses.…

We only just got to the surgical/N95 mask article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). We’ve been traveling and haven’t been able to keep up with what others were saying, but we’re sure it’s been well covered by the usual suspects. So we’ll just add our take here, for what it’s worth.

It’s being described as a “dramatic settlement” that will set a pattern for the nation. Let’s hope so, because the agreement reached yesterday by the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee (CNA/NNOC) and hospital player Catholic Healthcare West (CHW) sounds like just what the doctor ordered. It covers 32 CHW facilities in California and Nevada,…

In an earlier post I said I opposed mandatory vaccination for adults (but not for children), the one exception being for health care workers because they come in contact with people at high risk. My view then was that if you work in a health care institution and won’t get vaccinated against flu, then you…

Thinking about hospital surge

The Reveres have been around a long time and we know a lot of public health people in different states. Recently we were talking with a colleague about the problem of hospital surge capacity — the ability to handle a sudden demand for services — and she described her first job working for a state…

Swine flu: hospital surveillance data

Influenza surveillance in the US has at least five component parts (depending on how you count it is as many as seven). We discussed the virologic surveillance system in another post. CDC has two surveillance sub-systems that look at hospitalized cases with laboratory confirmed influenza, the New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) and the Emerging Infections…

Disinfecting keyboards

Fomites are inanimate objects that act as modes of transmission for infectious agents. You know. The doorknob or airplane armrest handled by someone who coughs on his hand or blows her nose. We know that some agents, like influenza viral particles, can remain viable (i.e., retain their ability to replicate in a host cell) for…

Cockroaches in the Intensive Care Unit

If you know your bugs you know that Blattella germanica and Periplaneta americana are cockroaches. They aren’t the only cockroach species. In fact there are an estimated 4000 different kinds of cockroach, many of them living in fields, forests or jungles. Unless they are living in your hospital’s Intensive Care Unit: