Open Access

Effect Measure

Category archives for Open Access

Open science, openly arrived at

As an academic researcher I don’t write grant proposals for a living, although sometimes it feels like I do. I need grants to do my work, but I also need to get to work and I don’t consider myself to be commuting for a living. Although sometimes it feels like I do. Having said that,…

It’s b-a-a-a-c-k. And I’m glad.

When two of the most loathsome members of the US Senate bring back again a bill that won’t die, you’d think I’d be in high dudgeon. But I’m not. I hope the bill isn’t killed or is allowed to die — again — and we finally get it. I’d much rather that the two right…

A scientific ethics of code

I’m a scientist and my research is supported by NIH, i.e., by American taxpayers. More importantly, the science I do is for anyone to use. I claim no proprietary rights. That’s what science is all about. We make our computer code publicly available, not just by request, but posted on the internet, and it is…

Early yesterday morning I received an email from my publisher that the journal for which I am co-editor in chief has been sold. Our journal is one of 180 published by BioMedCentral (BMC), the largest open access scientific publisher. The business model of BMC and other open access publishers is to charge the author, not…

John Conyers (D., Michigan) is a liberal Democrat. As head of the Judiciary Committee he has always carried water for the IP crowd. He’s at it again. And he isn’t alone. When it comes to paying off campaign contributers this is a non-partisant issue:

“Open Access” is apparently an Idea whose Time has Come:

The debate about how much wild migratory birds contribute to the spread of highly pathogenic influenza/A H5N1 goes on. According to a sensible Commentary in Nature (Dec. 6) it needn’t. We should have taken steps some time ago to answer an answerable question. But we didn’t and still haven’t initiated those steps:

Measles, influenza and open source software

Most people in the developed world think of measles as a pesky but fairly benign childhood disease. For the current generation, who has had the benefit of immunization with measles vaccine, it is also a historical curiosity. Not so for the developing world, where measles has been a major killer of children and infants. Africa…

SciBling Bora (aka coturnix) at Blog Around the Clock has scored a major coup for Open Access publishing today. Fittingly the subject matter is a dinosaur, an apt symbol for the new nail in the coffin of traditional scientific publishing that the paper represents. Bora is the Online Community Manager at PLoS-ONE (Public Library of…

In an Open Letter to the American Chemical Society my Scibling Janet Stemwedel at Adventures in Ethics and Science, an ACS member, asked several pointed questions about how the Society was running its publications. One of the flagship publications is Chemical & Engineering News, whose editor in chief, Rudy Baum responded to her via email…