Science education

Effect Measure

Category archives for Science education

Chilean earthquake and science

There is so much tragedy and sadness in the wake of the earthquakes in Haiti and Chile that to bemoan the fate of research projects there seems kind of trivial. But if you are scientist your heart really goes out to your Chilean colleagues. Jocelyn Kaiser and Antonio Regalado have some details at ScienceInsider, Science…

PowerPoint disease

This post contains an oldie but (fairly) goodie YouTube clip about PowerPoint (.ppt). I hate PowerPoint although I use it a lot out of laziness. I’ve been lecturing a long time and for at least half of it there was no such things as .ppt. If you had data you wanted to show, you thought…

“Science-Based Medicine 101″: FAIL

Science Based Medicine is a site we highly recommend with experienced scientists and practitioners in charge. In other words, it’s run by adults. But scientists often disagree about things. This is apparently a secret to non-scientists and many reporters who assume that when two scientists disagree, one is lying or wrong. But it’s true nonetheless.…

Pills, profits and medical schools

When I was in medical school it was common to get gifts from drug companies. Since many of us had very little money, the gifts were welcome. One company gave me a Littman stethoscope, at the time, the most advanced stethoscope around. The same model costs about $100 now. I was glad to get it,…

On a couple of occasions (here, here) we’ve taken note of the scientific controversy regarding the plasticizer, bisphenol-A (BPA). I shouldn’t really put it this way, because as the leading BPA researcher, Fred vom Saal of the Univeristy of Missouri said in the Washington Post over the weekend, there is no meaningful controversy any longer.…

The art professor is finally cleared but a distinguished biologist was still punished by a ridiculous, mindless, cruel and utterly reckless use of raw power by the Bush administration:

Carnegie-Mellon’s Dr. Strangeloves

Carnegie-Mellon is a great university and when it comes to robotics and computer science is always on the cutting edge. But does that cutting edge have to be so sharply lethal? Unmanned aircraft are showing up in the skies more often and today the US Army awarded $14.4 million to Carnegie Mellon to build a…

I don’t like to be a curmudgeon and I’m pretty tolerant when students write research papers that don’t quite make professional grade. Writing papers may look easy — you just have to report your results, right? — but it isn’t. Nor is designing a study or collecting the data. It takes time and practice to…

Medical education and the military

Medical education in the US is four grueling years on top of four years of undergraduate college education. The spectrum of topics is hugely wide and the depth of coverage hugely uneven. Some things are covered in ridiculous detail and others with breathtaking superficiality. And some things hardly at all:

Bush doctrine: no child travels ahead

The good news in 1995 was that American students performed better than Austrian students in advanced mathematics among students finishing highschool. The bad news was that Austria as the only on eof 16 countries American students finished ahead of, and in physics they didn’t even do that. They were dead last. A couple of weeks…