Scientific publishing

Effect Measure

Category archives for Scientific publishing

It’s b-a-a-a-c-k. And I’m glad.

When two of the most loathsome members of the US Senate bring back again a bill that won’t die, you’d think I’d be in high dudgeon. But I’m not. I hope the bill isn’t killed or is allowed to die — again — and we finally get it. I’d much rather that the two right…

A scientific ethics of code

I’m a scientist and my research is supported by NIH, i.e., by American taxpayers. More importantly, the science I do is for anyone to use. I claim no proprietary rights. That’s what science is all about. We make our computer code publicly available, not just by request, but posted on the internet, and it is…

The Nature blog, The Great Beyond, has an interesting although not surprising report of accusations on BBC that a cabal of researchers has been impeding publication of important stem cell research to help themselves or help their friends:

[Previous installments: here, here, here, here] We’d like to continue this series on randomized versus observational studies by discussing randomization, but upon reviewing comments and our previous post we decided to come at it from a slightly different direction. So we want to circle back and discuss counterfactuals a little more, clarifying and adapting some…

Let me start with an apology. This post is again fairly long (for a blog post). Blog readers don’t like long posts (at least I don’t). But once I started writing about this I was unable to stop at some intermediary point, although I might have made it more concise and less conversational. I haven’t…

The Tamiflu doesn’t work non-story

The other day the British Medical Journal (BMJ) published a clutch of articles about whether Tamiflu was as useful a drug as some have touted. I read the main article, another one of the Cochrane Collaborative meta-analyses of the studies they deem useful about any particular subject, and it didn’t seem to make much news.…

Peer review is hell

If you are a publishing scientist this will hit home. It’s making the rounds of the science community, so you may have seen it, but if you haven’t, it’s hilarious. In fact it’s still hilarious after the third and fourth times through. Warning: If you are sensitive about Hitler associated parodies, don’t watch it; I…

One of the by-products of the brouhaha (here, here) over The Atlantic article on vaccines was some interesting issues raised by the way the Knight Science Journalism Tracker handled it (here, here). If you aren’t familiar with KSJ Tracker, it’s a site that does “peer review” of science journalism. It’s goal “is to provide a…

Skeptical, but Hope Springs Eternal. The heaviest of the heavy-hitter science journals in the US is Science Magazine, a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). It publishes in all aspects of science. Its main competitor is the venerable Nature magazine in the UK. I subscribe to both. They come every…

Vaccines is a topic I don’t like writing about so much for many reasons. Vaccination programs are important to public health but we (all the Reveres, including this one) have always interested either in basic science or programs that are applied to the whole population at once, such as clean water, air or food or…