Eruptions

Archives for September, 2008

The Discovery Channel brings us a story on how the exact (well, semi-exact if you read the article) date for the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius has been nailed down by dating, well, fish sauce. The findings? The records of antiquity were right, it was probably around August 24, 79 A.D. and if you get…

It has been awhile since we’ve talked of Chaiten, so I thought I’d touch upon “the eruption of 2008” (really, no one else is close). Spring time has arrived in southern Chile, and the Patagonia area has cleaned up a lot of the ash from the eruption (but not the town of Chaiten). National Tourism Service says…

Small eruption at Shiveluch

Shiveluch in Kamchatka experience a small eruption today. Russian authorities reported a ~4,500 meter ash column with associated local earthquakes, likely related to the eruption. In the same article, both Karymsky and Klyuchevskaya Sopka (also known as Kliuchevskoi) are erupting or showing signs of increased activity. Shiveluch is one of the many active volcanoes along the Kamchatkan arc that…

Eruptions Poll results

Thanks to everyone who has responded to my Eruptions poll so far. Looks like we have a couple clear favorites, based on the results right now: Profiles of historic eruptions – 35% Profiles of active volcanoes – 33% Discussion of monitoring techniques – 18% Discussion of volcanic hazards – 15% So, I’ll start thinking about some…

The fun of random speculation

If anyone has been watching the earthquakes worldwide today, you might have noticed that there have been three >M2.5 earthquakes in the Yellowstone Caldera today at depths <10 km. Not to say that it is anything, but just something to note.

The big boulders of Tonga

This might not be directly related to a volcanic eruption, but it has been picked up by a lot of news sources, so I thought I’d give it a mention. A report from researchers at University of Texas hypothesize that some very large coral boulders (up to 10 meters tall) that can be found on…

When there is no news …

As you could probably figure out, sometimes there isn’t much new volcano-related news out there in the get interwebs. I’ve been trying to think of ways to fill in some of that time, but I thought I’d ask you, the readers, what you’d like to see. Please respond to the poll (below) and leave me…

New eruption at Piton de la Fournaise

It seems that a new fissure eruption has begun at Piton de la Fournaise on Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean*. In fact, the report goes onto say that a small lava lake has formed at the main crater of the eruption. This marks the first eruption at Piton de la Fournaise since March 2007. Piton de…

A new heating cycle for Ruapehu

Ruapehu is a noisy volcano, showing signs of eruptions on a yearly basis. It is also a potentially very hazardous volcano as it produces abundant lahars and has the capacity to generate a catastrophic lahar if the crater lake at the summit were to be breached by an eruption. This is why Ruapehu is one…

Mount Nantai is younger than it looks

It is always fun to me when we discover that a volcano long considered dormant or extinct has seen activity in the recent past. I bring this up because Mount Nantai in Japan, a volcano that was considered to have last erupted over 10,000 to 20,000 years ago (if not longer) looks to have actually…