Eruptions

Looks like last night was busy, volcanically speaking. Eruptions readers noted that VAAC warning of ash from both Mayon (to 10,000 feet / 3.0 km) and Bezymianny (to 32,000 feet / 10 km) were issued {hat tip to Chance Metz for the updates}. Here is some more news on these ongoing events:


Mayon erupting in December 2009.

Mayon, Philippines
Evacuations are continuing near Mayon in the Philippines, some of them forcibly by the local authorities. PHIVOLCS is reporting that SO2 output from Mayon has jumped from ~750 tonnes/day to almost 2,800 tonnes/day over the last 24 hours and seimicity continues to increase. The ash cloud might have reached 10,000 feet / 3 km according to the VAAC warning, suggesting a larger explosive component than we’ve seen so far. It is amusing that after one day of coverage the BBC already has gone to a headline of “Philippine volcano Mount Mayon ‘still a danger'”, implying that it is odd that it is still dangerous after a day of activity, especially considering that PHIVOLCS is warning people that Mayon could be dangerous for months. The NASA Earth Observatory posted a ALI on EO-1 shot of Mayon taken on December 16, showing the proximity of the volcano (and its eruptive products) to Legazpi City.

Bezymianny, Russia
Meanwhile, to the north of the Philippines (well, quite a ways to the north), Bezymianny on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia erupted. The volcano experienced a number of explosions and produced an ash plume that reached upwards of 10 km / 32,000 feet, although some reports put the plume as tall as 15 km / 40,000 feet. Local authorities are warning the few people living near the volcano to stay indoors if possible.

Comments

  1. #1 Chance Metz
    December 17, 2009

    Yet another ash eruption form Mayon,this time to 12,000 feet.

    Received FVFE01 at 01:08 UTC, 18/12/09 from RJTD
    VA ADVISORY

    DTG: 20091218/0107Z
    VAAC: TOKYO
    VOLCANO: MAYON 0703-03
    PSN: N1315E12341
    AREA: PHILIPPINES
    SUMMIT ELEV: 2462M
    ADVISORY NR: 2009/6
    INFO SOURCE: MTSAT-1R RPLL
    AVIATION COLOUR CODE: NIL
    ERUPTION DETAILS: VA OBS FL120 EXTD SW WAS REPORTED AT 20091218/0030Z

    OBS VA DTG: 17/2359Z
    OBS VA CLD: VA NOT IDENTIFIABLE FROM SATELLITE DATA. WINDS ABV THE
    VO
    LCANO AT 18/0030Z FL050 060/14KT FL120 340/1KT FROM JMA NWP MODEL.
    FCST VA CLD +6HR: NIL
    FCST VA CLD +12HR: NIL
    FCST VA CLD +18HR: NIL
    RMK: NIL
    NXT ADVISORY: NO FURTHER ADVISORIES=

  2. #2 Sikat ang Pinoy Talambuhay
    December 17, 2009

    Hello, I’m searching google and found your blog nice post. Mabuhay Sikat ang Pinoy!

  3. #3 Chance Metz
    December 17, 2009

    Looks like the volcanic is getting even more active,248 earthquakes in one day?!?

    Mayon Volcano Bulletin 4
    18 December 2009

    7:00 AM

    Mayon Volcano (13.2576 N, 123.6856 E) manifested an increase in its activity during the past observation period. A total of two hundred forty eight (248) volcanic quakes and tremors were recorded by the seismic network. Fifty (50) of these events were explosion type, however, only seven (7) were observed during times of good visibility. These explosions produced dark gray to dark brown ash columns that reached a maximum height of up to 1000m above the summit before drifting towards southwest. Harmonic tremors were continuously recorded by the seismic instruments.

    During the cloud break this morning, steaming activity ranged from dirty white to light brown in color. Night observation showed an intensified crater glow.

    The advancing lava flow has now reached approximately 3 kilometers downslope from the crater while incandescent fragments from the lava pile continuously roll down along Bonga Gully reaching about 3-4 kilometers downslope. Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) emission rate was still high at 1,065 tonnes per day (t/d).

    Alert Level 3 remained hoisted over Mayon Volcano. Since an increasing trend is noticeable at present, the possibility of hazardous volcanic eruption is high. Thus, PHIVOLCS-DOST recommends that the 6-km radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) around the volcano and the 7-km Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) on the southeast flank of the volcano should be free from human activity because of sudden explosions that may generate hazardous volcanic flows. In addition, areas in the south that are outside the 7 kilometer danger zone but within 8 kilometers of the crater should be extra alert for increased volcanic activity. Active river channels and those perennially identified as lahar prone in the southern sector should also be avoided especially during bad weather conditions or when there is heavy and prolonged rainfall. PHIVOLCS–DOST is closely monitoring Mayon Volcano’s activity and any new significant development will be immediately posted to all concerned.

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