Caldera

Eruptions

Category archives for Caldera

Mt. Elbrus in southern Russia, one of the active volcanoes in the Caucasus Mountains. (Note the prominent flow levees sticking out of the snow cover on the dacite lava flow in the middle of the image.) Most people (including myself) aren’t fully aware of the active volcanoes in the Caucasus Mountains, but sure enough, there…

Eruptions Summer Schedule

Mineral King valley in California. Well, we are in the peak of the summer, so Eruptions will be running a bit of summer schedule while I’m off away from the interweb tubes. First off, from July 11-20, I’ll be off in the mountains, doing some much-needed fieldwork with my (first) undergraduate research student. We’ll be…

Did I mention its a busy week? The lava lake at Erta’Ale in 2008. Image courtesy of Stromboli Online. Our Icelandic saga continues, with more earthquakes and more speculation/information on the parts of Eruptions readers. Keep up the discussion – I’ll be fascinated to see who turns out to get closest to what actually happens,…

Some news for a busy Tuesday: The crater at Poas volcano in Costa Rica, taken February 25, 2010. Image courtesy of OVSICORI by Federico Chavarria. After the MSNBC debacle, it is nice to see some good articles on why the Chilean earthquake was overall less disastrous than the Haitian earthquake, why the tsunami wasn’t as…

News! Toba caldera in Indonesia. We’re all still talking about the Chilean earthquake and the coverage of the event. If you happen to live in the Columbus area, you might have heard me on WTVN talking about the earthquake as well. The Toba (Indonesia) eruption 74,000 years ago has been used by some researchers to…

The Great Earthquake Swarm at Yellowstone that ushered in 2010 seems to be dying down, at least according to the USGS earthquake reports and analysis of the seismicity by the University of Utah and YVO. The daily updates on the earthquake swarms by Utah has ended. Looking at the earthquake over the last 7 days…

We’ve been discussing calderas recently on Eruptions (I wonder why) and the Laacher See in Germany came up. I’ve actually been to the Laacher See on a field trip lead by one of the world’s experts on the caldera, Dr. Gerhard Worner. So, I thought I’d post some pictures and talk a little about this…

With all the talk of the current Yellowstone earthquake swarm, I thought it would worth it to write a post on the the structure and caldera – and why we get earthquake swarms that are structurally rather than magmatically-related. First off, lets think about why calderas formed. This is relatively simple – at least superficially.…

Steaming, gurgling mudpots in the active hydrothermal system of Yellowstone. For those of you following Yellowstone (I think there might be a few of you), I’ve plotted up the earthquakes since 1/27 (see below) – and sure enough, although there is a lot of scatter, they are getting shallower – however what this exactly means…

There has been a … ahem … healthy discussion of Yellowstone’s current earthquake swarm on Eruptions as of late. We’ve now reached ~1,500 measurable earthquakes over the last 11 days. The latest reports of the continuation of the swarm isn’t going to make anyone happy, but still, there are no signs that (a) this is…