Italy

Eruptions

Category archives for Italy

Just a reminder … Etna erupting in November 2002. If you have any questions for Dr. Boris Behncke, who runs Italy’s Volcanoes along with the volcanology page for the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Catania, please send them in to me at . I’ve got some good question so far!

The first Q&A with Dr. Jonathan Castro was such a success, I’m going to try to make this a regular feature. On that note, Eruptions reader Dr. Boris Behncke has volunteered to be the second geologist to take the plunge. Here is a little about Boris and his work: I’ve studied geology first in Bochum,…

Some brief tidbits for your Wednesday: The view of Mt. Saint Helens from the Johnston Ridge Observatory. There is a decent article about research being done at a dissected caldera system in the Italian Alps’ Sesia Valley. The caldera in question is the Permian in age (248-298 million years old) so don’t expect to find…

Living around (and in?) volcanoes

There are a couple article out today concerning volcanoes and the economy, one on the plus side, one on the minus side. Volcano Buono in Italy near Naples. First off, nothing like volcanism to get me stoked for buying stuff, eh? Actually, I have to admit, the Volcano Buono mall (yes, mall) in Italy near…

Volcano Profile: Mt. Vesuvius

The latest in my Volcano Profiles Series, we turn to Europe and Vesuvius. You could fill many, many volumes with the works produced on Vesuvius since Roman times. This profile will barely scratch the surface when it comes to the vast geologic and human history surrounding the volcano, but it is a start. If you…

We’ve already talked about how many active volcanoes reside in Indonesia, but this week’s USGS/SI update just drives that point home. Listed in the update are no less than 5 volcanoes were activity is being seen or is on the increase (Karangetang, Slamet, Dukono, Batu Tara and Makian). This doesn’t mean mention the activity at…

Eruptions Mailbag #2

I get a fairly steady stream of emails from Eruptions readers, some of which are very worth a post, but sometimes it takes me a while to get around to posting. This is my second attempt to catch up on these mailbag emails. Remember, feel free to email me questions or comments whether you want. Reader…

The last moments of Pompeii

Sometimes I wonder if we know more about the fates of people who died in a volcanic eruption over 1800 years ago than we do about most people who died in any given eruption this year. Not that there is anything particularly wrong with that – we’re fascinated by both volcanoes and Roman antiquity –…

The Discovery Channel brings us a story on how the exact (well, semi-exact if you read the article) date for the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius has been nailed down by dating, well, fish sauce. The findings? The records of antiquity were right, it was probably around August 24, 79 A.D. and if you get…

For those of us who track volcanoes and the hazards they present, the general consensus is that Mount Vesuvius in Italy is probably the most dangerous volcano in the world today. This is not because it is the biggest or most powerful, but because it is located on the outskirts of Naples, Italy, a city with over…