Ruapehu

Eruptions

Category archives for Ruapehu

National Geographic film crew near Eyjafjallajökull, April 18, 2010. UPDATE 1PM EDT 4/19/2010: I can almost categorically say that Hekla is NOT erupting, contrary to Twitter or the brief banner on MSNBC. See my comment below (#68). In what is sounding like a bit of a broken record, the eruption at Eyjafjallajökull is still going.…

Monday Musings

Some brief notes before I dive headlong into the exciting world of faculty orientation! A small steam plume coming from Turrialba in Costa Rica. Photo taken in August 2007. There are some preliminary reports of the state of wildlife (and everything) around Kasatochi Island in the Aleutians from the US F&W and USGS team that…

Vote for the next Volcano Profile

Time to vote for the next Volcano Profile. Feel free to leave any comments or suggestions after answering the poll! What should be the next volcano for the “Volcano Profile” series?(surveys)

Now that we’ve had three Volcano Profiles: Rabaul, Hood and Vesuvius, now it is time to vote on the next volcano. Take your pick and leave comments! What volcano should be featured as the next “Volcano Profile”?(polling)

Things were relatively quiet, volcanically speaking, over the weekend and that reminded me, it is just about time to vote on the next in my Volcano Profile series. We’ve had two volcanoes featured so far: Rabaul in Papua New Guinea and Hood in Oregon. Take a look at the list below and vote for the…

Ruapehu video help

I wouldn’t normally use this blog for something like this, but google has failed me. When I was in New Zealand, I saw a video on the 1995-96 eruptions at Ruapehu titled Witness to Eruption made in, I believe, 1999. It had some excellent footage of the eruptions in the 1990s as well as the…

A new heating cycle for Ruapehu

Ruapehu is a noisy volcano, showing signs of eruptions on a yearly basis. It is also a potentially very hazardous volcano as it produces abundant lahars and has the capacity to generate a catastrophic lahar if the crater lake at the summit were to be breached by an eruption. This is why Ruapehu is one…

Ruapehu settles down

I suppose this is more “unnews” than “news”, but workers at Ruapehu in New Zealand report that seismicity has decreased, gas emissions have returned to background and the crater lake has cooled, indicating that the current eruptive cycle which started in September 2007 might be winding down. There was some concern earlier in the summer…

Almost 9 months since its last eruption, Ruapehu is keeping New Zealanders guessing about its next move. Brad Scott of GNS Science (NZ) reports that the crater lake at Ruapehu is reading unusually warm temperatures and high gas emissions, well after geologists there would have expected after the last eruption. Their conclusion doesn’t seem to…

Ruapehu: Lava versus skiers

I think we know who wins this battle. At Ruapehu (New Zealand), it isn’t really the lava that is the problem, but the lahars produced by mixing snow, crater lake water and volcanic debris. However, that is not stopping people from wanting to ski on the volcano. Never ceases to amaze me how people assess…