seismicity

Eruptions

Category archives for seismicity

Some news for a busy Tuesday: The crater at Poas volcano in Costa Rica, taken February 25, 2010. Image courtesy of OVSICORI by Federico Chavarria. After the MSNBC debacle, it is nice to see some good articles on why the Chilean earthquake was overall less disastrous than the Haitian earthquake, why the tsunami wasn’t as…

News! Toba caldera in Indonesia. We’re all still talking about the Chilean earthquake and the coverage of the event. If you happen to live in the Columbus area, you might have heard me on WTVN talking about the earthquake as well. The Toba (Indonesia) eruption 74,000 years ago has been used by some researchers to…

Screen capture of the MSNBC website on February 27, 2010 at ~5:30 PM eastern time. Most of you have probably already heard about the magnitude 8.8 earthquake that struck today off the coast of Chile. This becomes one of the most powerful earthquakes on record and so far, the death toll has been relatively low…

The flu has retreated and I’m getting back on track. Huzzah! I’ll get back to the blog by posting this week’s new USGS / Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program Weekly Volcano Report. Looks like some interesting stuff in it … Looks like there were some small eruptions from Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania. The volcano is…

The Icelandic coast of Reykjanes where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge comes above sea level. A number of Eruptions readers have noticed that seismicity along the Reykjanes Ridge that runs to the southwest of Iceland onto the island has increased over the last few days. Sure enough, checking the Icelandic Met Office page on seismicity on the…

The rhyolite domes of Chaiten in Chile in an undated photo. Note how much of the previous Chaiten Caldera has already been filled by the new domes that started after Chaiten erupted in May 2008. CNN International has a report that the National Emergency Office (ONEMI) in Chile has reinforced the “red alert” status of…

The Great Earthquake Swarm at Yellowstone that ushered in 2010 seems to be dying down, at least according to the USGS earthquake reports and analysis of the seismicity by the University of Utah and YVO. The daily updates on the earthquake swarms by Utah has ended. Looking at the earthquake over the last 7 days…

News! Pakistan is home to the world’s tallest mud volcano in the region of Balochistan – and its somewhat near the reports of an “eruption” earlier this week. Guess what? Since Wednesday evening, seismicity at Yellowstone has dropped precipitously. The last batch of earthquakes on February 3rd were also back to deeper levels – 8-9…

“Eruption” in Azerbijian

A 2010 mud flow from Lok-Batan, a mud volcano in Azerbijian. So, first there was all the Yellowstone talk. Then the unsubstantiated reports of a volcanic eruption in a decidedly unvolcanic part of Pakistan (what part isn’t), then submarine volcanism off Japan. Now, we have a nrews report about an eruption in Azerbijian. Luckily, although…

With all the talk of the current Yellowstone earthquake swarm, I thought it would worth it to write a post on the the structure and caldera – and why we get earthquake swarms that are structurally rather than magmatically-related. First off, lets think about why calderas formed. This is relatively simple – at least superficially.…