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Category archives for USGS

News! Pakistan is home to the world’s tallest mud volcano in the region of Balochistan – and its somewhat near the reports of an “eruption” earlier this week. Guess what? Since Wednesday evening, seismicity at Yellowstone has dropped precipitously. The last batch of earthquakes on February 3rd were also back to deeper levels – 8-9…

With all the talk of the current Yellowstone earthquake swarm, I thought it would worth it to write a post on the the structure and caldera – and why we get earthquake swarms that are structurally rather than magmatically-related. First off, lets think about why calderas formed. This is relatively simple – at least superficially.…

Steaming, gurgling mudpots in the active hydrothermal system of Yellowstone. For those of you following Yellowstone (I think there might be a few of you), I’ve plotted up the earthquakes since 1/27 (see below) – and sure enough, although there is a lot of scatter, they are getting shallower – however what this exactly means…

First off, I wanted to thank all of the Eruptions readers for making January the most popular month ever on this blog. I suppose I should give an assist to Yellowstone, but really, thanks for coming to the blog, reading the posts and engaging in all the great discussions that go on within its (cyber)walls.…

Some news for the last Friday in January: Volcanic lightning captured over Redoubt in March 2009. Tungurahua in Ecuador continues to erupt. Yesterday, the volcano spread ash over much of central Ecuador. Apparently people in Ecuador aren’t taking the hazard of ash too seriously, with many ignoring recommendations to wear masks when the ash is…

Old Faithful geyser at Yellowstone National Park. A few thoughts about faulting, earthquakes and eruptions: The earthquakes at Yellowstone have been universally attributed to fault movement rather than magmatic activity by the USGS and the researchers at the University of Utah. This is likely based on the moment solutions for the earthquakes (i.e., the sense…

Outcrops of Obsidian Butte, California, near the Salton Sea. A brief update on the two earthquake swarms making news right now: Yellowstone The earthquake swarm at Yellowstone is still rumbling along, reaching over 1,000 earthquakes measured over the last week. However, the swarm has begun to die down overnight – with no earthquakes between 10:41…

This week’s USGS/Smithsonian GVP Volcano Update! Highlights include: A volcano I had never heard of in the Kuril islands is showing signs of life: Kharimkotan. Satellite images show a thermal anomaly at the summit of the volcano – its last known eruption was in 1933. Ash, sulfur dioxide and steam continue to erupt from Nyamuragira…

A hot spring in Yellowstone National Park. Image courtesy of the USGS. Yesterday I left a little teaser about the current earthquake swarm going on at the Yellowstone Caldera. Eruptions readers have come through with even more information on the swarm. Over 250 earthquakes have occurred in the park over the last few days, most…

The steam plume from Turrialba on December 26, 2009. Image by Eruptions reader Sahrye Cohen. Turrialba Costa Rican officials extended the evacuation zone around Turrialba from 3 to 6 km, raising the alert status at the volcano to Yellow. Vanessa Rosales of the National Emergency Commission described the seismicity as “intense but low,” but says…