Volcano research

Eruptions

Category archives for Volcano research

Lots of little pieces of news I’ve run across … time to play a little catch up. Stromboli: A volcano after Don Ho’s heart. Every once in a while, my RSS feeds will dredge up some articles from years gone by … and this week there were two New York Times pieces that are a…

Climate, volcanism and the Andes

The northern Chilean and southern Peruvian Andes are full of volcanoes that look stunning – I mean, jaw-dropping details of volcanism litter the landscape. The reason for this is two fold: (1) there is an awful lot of volcanism in the northern Chilean/southern Peruvian Andes (as known as the Central Volcanic Zone) – and has…

Our tour of the Marianas begins SW of Guam. In this area the volcanoes are submerged and make up a region known as the Southern Seamount Province. Our first stop is Tracey Seamount, which lies 30 km west of Guam. Tracey is a ~2 km tall cone and volume of ~45 km3 It is one…

This week I welcome Dr. Ed Kohut as a guest blogger here on Eruptions (while I am off in the Sierras doing some field work). I’ve known Ed for 10 years now – we were both graduate students in igneous petrology at Oregon State University – and we are both Massachusetts natives. Ed was in…

Eruptions Word of the Day: Tuya

The latest Eruptions Word of the Day is “Tuya“. So, what is a tuya? This is a tuya: A tuya! Click on the image to see a larger version. Image by Erik Klemetti. Alright, well, that doesn’t entirely help, does it? Lets look at the feature the arrow indicates. Some observations: (1) It is low…

Eruptions Summer Schedule

Mineral King valley in California. Well, we are in the peak of the summer, so Eruptions will be running a bit of summer schedule while I’m off away from the interweb tubes. First off, from July 11-20, I’ll be off in the mountains, doing some much-needed fieldwork with my (first) undergraduate research student. We’ll be…

A few very quick hits: Ever-looming Mt. Rainier, with Tacoma, Washington in the foreground. PHIVOLCS is pondering whether to lower the Alert Status at Taal back to Level 1. The volcano has been on Alert Level 2 for the past month after increasing signs of potential eruptive activity. However, seismicity is down at Taal, so…

So, I’ve had requests on the blog to help to do some defining of volcanologic terms on the blog, so I thought I’d try a new column called Eruptions Word of the Day. I’m not sure how often it will run, but let’s give it a try. Eruptions Word of the Day for July 5,…

“Great” headlines attack!

Africa is threatened by “scorching hot blobs of magma” according to the CSM. Nothing like some fabulous headlines to make your day. The first (courtesy of the Christian Science Monitor) Massive blob of scorching magma discovered under southern Africa Oh my! Yes, again, it seems that the many people in the media seem to be…

Crater lake at Eyjafjallajökull

The crater lake at Eyjafjallajökull as seen on June 11, 2010. Image from the Icelandic Met Office by Sveinn Brynjólfsson. After keeping us transfixed for almost two months this spring, Eyjafjallajökull has slowly drifted from the headlines. However, this doesn’t mean that interesting things – volcanologically-speaking – have stopped happening at the Icelandic volcano. For…