Volcano research

Eruptions

Category archives for Volcano research

Last year I mentioned the fundraiser for the excellent Mt. Baker Volcano Research Center – and lo and behold, I will mention it again. The new 2010 t-shirts are out and you can purchase one to support one of the best volcano research sites on the web (and off the web) – with a plethora…

Looking for some volcano news – you’ve found it. A shot of volcano “tourists” near the erupting Pacaya. Photo by the Associated Press. Eruptions reader Dr. Boris Behncke dropped a note that Kilauea has not one but two active lava lakes right now. The lava lakes can be seen on the webcams for the Halema`uma`u…

The NASA Earth Observatory has been dazzling us with images from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption for months – but they have been dazzling us with volcanoes images for years! Here are two more images for those of you who love seeing volcanoes from above: Cleveland, Alaska As I mentioned earlier this week, Cleveland volcano likely had…

This week is the Cities on Volcanoes conference – now in its sixth iteration. This year the conference is in Tenerife in the Canary Islands and while I wish I could be there, I’m not. However, we can all live vicariously through Dr. David Calvo, who will be sending daily updates from the meeting. He’s…

The ash plume from Eyjafjallajökull, piercing the cloud deck above the volcano. Image courtesy of the Icelandic Met Office, taken on May 13, 2010. See the latest report on the eruption. With all the rapid fire news on eruptions as of late, combined with my busy schedule during the school year, I haven’t been able…

News, news, news! Ash from Eyjafjallajökull piling up on a roof at Seljavellir. Image courtesy of the IMO, by Ari Tryggvason. The latest from Eyjafjallajökull has the volcano continuing to puff away – producing intermittent airspace closures over Europe. The Icelandic Met Office reports a ~7 km (21,000 foot) ash plume, but they note that…

Some news for a sleepy Monday: Mt. Hood in Oregon. The ash from Eyjafjallajökull is, once again, causing significant airspace closure over northern Europe – close of 1,000 flights today. However, much of the closures are fairly short-lived, but that isn’t keeping people happy. The eruption hasn’t actually changed much, just that the winds are…

The Gígjökull outlet glacier on Eyjafjallajökull, showing the steaming lava flow carving its way through the glacier. Image taken May 5, 2010 by Dr. Joseph Licciardi. A quick update on the ongoing activity at Eyjafjallajökull: The activity at the volcano continues to be more explosive during the last few days than it was in the…

Grading grading grading! A webcam capture of the eruptive plume from Eyjafjallajökull on the morning of May 6, 2010. News: A quick update on the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: The volcano has been producing an impressive ash plume over the last day (see image above). The current ash plume is reaching 5.8-6 km height (19-20,000 ft) –…

Mt. Saint Helens erupting in 2004. I had a chance to watch a new NOVA special that airs May 5 (PBS) on the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruption cycles at Mt. Saint Helens, along with the recovery of the blast zone from the 1980 eruption. It is a fitting episode as we approach the 30th anniversary…