Volcanoes and the economy

Eruptions

Category archives for Volcanoes and the economy

Grading grading grading! A webcam capture of the eruptive plume from Eyjafjallajökull on the morning of May 6, 2010. News: A quick update on the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: The volcano has been producing an impressive ash plume over the last day (see image above). The current ash plume is reaching 5.8-6 km height (19-20,000 ft) –…

A shot of the strombolian activity at the vent of Eyjafjallajökull, taken on May 4, 2010. Image courtesy of the Iceland Met Office. The latest news from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption has the volcano erupting more explosively again (see above), possibly due to an increased influx of water into the vent area – in any case,…

News! Colima in Mexico erupting in 2008. The current activity at Eyjafjallajökull is more-or-less unchanged, with strombolian activity producing a 3-4 km tall ash-and-steam plume and the lava flows at the crater moving northward towards the Gígjökull glacier. You can check out an extensive page on the state of this eruption at the Nordic Volcanological…

An undated painting of the island volcano of Ischia near the Bay of Naples, Italy. Guess what? It is the end of the semester (well, school year) here at Denison, so I might be a little busy for the next couple weeks. Here are some news bits (with special thanks to all who emailed me…

Night image of Eyjafjallajökull erupting on April 24, 2010. Image courtesy of James Ashworth. A quick update on the Eyjafjallajökull eruption: Not a lot to report in terms of changes in the volcanic activity at the volcano. The update from the Icelandic Met Office last night sums it up nicely: Overall activity similar as yesterday.…

A night shot of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption showing the glowing plume from the strombolian explosions and the Aurora Borealis overhead. A quick update on the current activity at Eyjafjallajökull eruption: the eruption continues at the summit craters, but there seems to be less ash being erupted, at least yesterday. The latest update from the Icelandic…

A strombolian eruption in the crater of Eyjafjallajökull, taken on April 19, 2010. Image courtesy of the Icelandic Met Office. The Eyjafjallajökull eruption in Iceland has been one of the most fascinating eruptions in recent memory – and this is beyond the fact that it is a prime example of a “wired” eruption, where people…

The ash-and-steam plume from Eyjafjallajökull on April 19, 2010. Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland is slowly settling into a pattern of strombolian-to-surtseyan (depending on meltwater access to the crater) explosions that have been sending ash up to 2-5 km above the summit. We can see this new, more diffuse plume in the recent NASA EO image of…

Gaua erupting in February 2010. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory. As a certain famous Icelandic native would say, “there is more to life than this.” Some other volcano news from around the world: The situation at Gaua in Vanuatu is worsening. Ash from the current eruption is contaminating water and food supplies on…

Eyjafjallajokull erupting on 4/17/2010, image by Marco Fulle. Note the “rooster tails” of ash and steam, typical for Surtseyan eruptions. European airspace has slowly begun to reopen as the explosive eruptions at Eyjafjallajökull have become less intense over the last 24 hours. However, there is still lots of hazardous airspace and airports around places like…