lava flows

Eruptions

Tag archives for lava flows

The final part of Etna Week, brought to us by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 and Part 2 as well! Etna Volcanic hazards By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Etna is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, and a population of nearly one million people dwell on its flanks,…

Etna Week Part 1 Mount Etna – Brief Anatomy of an Exceptional Volcano By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Italy truly deserves to be called “the Cradle of Volcanology” – not only because it hosts virtually all existing types of volcanoes and volcanic rock compositions, and seven of its volcanoes have had confirmed eruptions during…

Mt. Hood in Oregon, taken August 2008. Image by Erik Klemetti. Click on the image to see a larger version. Quick news! I’m not going to go into too much depth right now about the recent study published in Nature Geoscience on Mt. Hood in Oregon – I plan to talk about it more in…

Lots of little pieces of news I’ve run across … time to play a little catch up. Stromboli: A volcano after Don Ho’s heart. Every once in a while, my RSS feeds will dredge up some articles from years gone by … and this week there were two New York Times pieces that are a…

Lava flows from Kilauea in Hawai`i move towards a home in Kalapana. Whenever I think about the hazards posed by most lava flows, I tend to think about the opening scene in the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Developers are planning to knock our hero Arthur Dent’s house down and as a last ditch effort…

Climate, volcanism and the Andes

The northern Chilean and southern Peruvian Andes are full of volcanoes that look stunning – I mean, jaw-dropping details of volcanism litter the landscape. The reason for this is two fold: (1) there is an awful lot of volcanism in the northern Chilean/southern Peruvian Andes (as known as the Central Volcanic Zone) – and has…

Tourists hiking next to an active lava flow on Pacaya in Guatemala in 2006. I’m flying back to Ohio today after a successful few weeks of fieldwork/paper writing. Apparently I have a pile of tomatoes waiting in our garden in Granville … ! On to news: To go with the news that lava flows from…

Kilauea lavas on the move near Kalapana. Image taken July 17, courtesy of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Some news over the last few days: The lava flows from Kilauea are moving with a vengeance right now, damaging roads and heading for some structures. The lava flows near Kalapana have moved almost 200 meters since Sunday,…

The latest update from the Smithsonian/USGS Global Volcanism Program! Highlights (not including Taal, Eyjafjallajökull and Bezymianny) include: Another thermal anomaly was spotted on an Kuril Island volcano – this one being Tiatia. The volcano has no seismic monitoring network, so the thermal anomaly is all that has been observed. Lava flows and strombolian explosions continue…

The NASA Earth Observatory has been dazzling us with images from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption for months – but they have been dazzling us with volcanoes images for years! Here are two more images for those of you who love seeing volcanoes from above: Cleveland, Alaska As I mentioned earlier this week, Cleveland volcano likely had…