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Eruptions

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Kilauea lavas on the move near Kalapana. Image taken July 17, courtesy of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Some news over the last few days: The lava flows from Kilauea are moving with a vengeance right now, damaging roads and heading for some structures. The lava flows near Kalapana have moved almost 200 meters since Sunday,…

Thanks for all the words/advice about Pepsigeddon here at SB. If you missed it, the powers that be have officially pulled the plug on the PepsiBlog. However, this crisis (as much as blogging can be a crisis) has reinforced a lot of long-standing problems with the management here at SB, so not to sound like…

A pause for thought.

If you haven’t heard, ScienceBlogs HQ has put its foot squarely in its jaw thanks to a little poor decision-making. Now, Eruptions is a little outside the mainstream of ScienceBlogs – there aren’t many corporations that might influence my posting (unless you suddenly see “Eruptions – brought to you by RyanAir” the next time an…

“Great” headlines attack!

Africa is threatened by “scorching hot blobs of magma” according to the CSM. Nothing like some fabulous headlines to make your day. The first (courtesy of the Christian Science Monitor) Massive blob of scorching magma discovered under southern Africa Oh my! Yes, again, it seems that the many people in the media seem to be…

Looking for some volcano news – you’ve found it. A shot of volcano “tourists” near the erupting Pacaya. Photo by the Associated Press. Eruptions reader Dr. Boris Behncke dropped a note that Kilauea has not one but two active lava lakes right now. The lava lakes can be seen on the webcams for the Halema`uma`u…

This week has been destroyed by workshops and my last death throes with a paper I am submitting on my research in New Zealand. And to think, I thought it might settle down a little after the students left. To news! Ash fall on a taxi cab near Guatemala’s Pacaya. Pacaya in Guatemala erupted yesterday…

Lots to do! Tourists flock to the Eyjafjallajökull-Fimmvörduháls in Iceland. The media does love the term “supervolcano”, and a number of Eruptions readers sent me a link to the article on the dreaded submarine “supervolcanoes”. I would delve into this article from Live Science, but it sadly again does a dreadful job with a lot…