Volcano Research

Eruptions

Tag archives for Volcano Research

Sorry about the lack of posts – I’ve been not only frantically prepping for class and my Eyja talk, but also I’m somewhat under the weather with an ill-timed sickness, so even though there is stuff to talk about, I haven’t really had time/wherewithal to deal with it. However, expect big things from Eruptions next…

Finally, a chance to catch up a bit … ! Yasur erupting in May of 2010. Some news from the world of volcanoes: The BBC has a series of videos one the fallout from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption – including a look at the area around the volcano and how the economy has been affected by…

The final part of Etna Week, brought to us by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 and Part 2 as well! Etna Volcanic hazards By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Etna is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, and a population of nearly one million people dwell on its flanks,…

This is Part 2 of 3 from guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 here. The current dynamics and activity of Etna by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke The recent behavior of Etna is characterized by nearly continuous eruptive activity from the summit craters and eruptions from new vents on the flanks at…

Welcome to Etna Week!

Italy’s Mt. Etna erupting in November 2006. Well, I am currently off in the wilderness, but that doesn’t mean that things aren’t still hopping here at Eruptions. We are lucky to have Dr. Boris Behncke of the INGV Catania as that blogger and he brings us a three-part series on Mt. Etna on the island…

Earlier this summer, we had a chance to ask Sally Kuhn Sennert of the Smithsonian Institution/USGS Global Volcanism Program questions about her job as the main writer of the well-loved Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. Well, now here are the answers! Sally Kuhn Sennert of the Global Volcanism Program in front of Mt. Rainier, Washington. Q&A…

Mt. Hood in Oregon, taken August 2008. Image by Erik Klemetti. Click on the image to see a larger version. Quick news! I’m not going to go into too much depth right now about the recent study published in Nature Geoscience on Mt. Hood in Oregon – I plan to talk about it more in…

Mt. Elbrus in southern Russia, one of the active volcanoes in the Caucasus Mountains. (Note the prominent flow levees sticking out of the snow cover on the dacite lava flow in the middle of the image.) Most people (including myself) aren’t fully aware of the active volcanoes in the Caucasus Mountains, but sure enough, there…

Lots of little pieces of news I’ve run across … time to play a little catch up. Stromboli: A volcano after Don Ho’s heart. Every once in a while, my RSS feeds will dredge up some articles from years gone by … and this week there were two New York Times pieces that are a…

Our tour of the Marianas begins SW of Guam. In this area the volcanoes are submerged and make up a region known as the Southern Seamount Province. Our first stop is Tracey Seamount, which lies 30 km west of Guam. Tracey is a ~2 km tall cone and volume of ~45 km3 It is one…