volcano scientist

Eruptions

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The final part of Etna Week, brought to us by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 and Part 2 as well! Etna Volcanic hazards By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Etna is one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, and a population of nearly one million people dwell on its flanks,…

This is Part 2 of 3 from guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Check out Part 1 here. The current dynamics and activity of Etna by guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke The recent behavior of Etna is characterized by nearly continuous eruptive activity from the summit craters and eruptions from new vents on the flanks at…

Etna Week Part 1 Mount Etna – Brief Anatomy of an Exceptional Volcano By guest blogger Dr. Boris Behncke. Italy truly deserves to be called “the Cradle of Volcanology” – not only because it hosts virtually all existing types of volcanoes and volcanic rock compositions, and seven of its volcanoes have had confirmed eruptions during…

Mt. Hood in Oregon, taken August 2008. Image by Erik Klemetti. Click on the image to see a larger version. Quick news! I’m not going to go into too much depth right now about the recent study published in Nature Geoscience on Mt. Hood in Oregon – I plan to talk about it more in…

Our tour of the Marianas begins SW of Guam. In this area the volcanoes are submerged and make up a region known as the Southern Seamount Province. Our first stop is Tracey Seamount, which lies 30 km west of Guam. Tracey is a ~2 km tall cone and volume of ~45 km3 It is one…

This week I welcome Dr. Ed Kohut as a guest blogger here on Eruptions (while I am off in the Sierras doing some field work). I’ve known Ed for 10 years now – we were both graduate students in igneous petrology at Oregon State University – and we are both Massachusetts natives. Ed was in…

Eruptions Summer Schedule

Mineral King valley in California. Well, we are in the peak of the summer, so Eruptions will be running a bit of summer schedule while I’m off away from the interweb tubes. First off, from July 11-20, I’ll be off in the mountains, doing some much-needed fieldwork with my (first) undergraduate research student. We’ll be…

As a part of my continuing Q&A series, I am pleased to announce that Sally Kuhn Sennert, compiler and author of the weekly Global Volcanism Program Volcanic Activity Reports, is the next up to take your questions. A little bit about Sally: Sally Kuhn Sennert graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Anthropology from the University…