volcanology basics

Eruptions

Tag archives for volcanology basics

Continuing my series where I try to define words of volcanic interest, the new Eruptions Word of the Day is a favorite of mine, mostly because my undergraduate thesis on Vinalhaven Island in Maine ended up dealing with a lot of these types of deposits … so, without further ado, the word is peperite! Now,…

Tourists hiking next to an active lava flow on Pacaya in Guatemala in 2006. I’m flying back to Ohio today after a successful few weeks of fieldwork/paper writing. Apparently I have a pile of tomatoes waiting in our garden in Granville … ! On to news: To go with the news that lava flows from…

So, I’ve had requests on the blog to help to do some defining of volcanologic terms on the blog, so I thought I’d try a new column called Eruptions Word of the Day. I’m not sure how often it will run, but let’s give it a try. Eruptions Word of the Day for July 5,…

Hope no one minds my shameless plug here, but I get a lot of questions about books to read if you’re interested in learning about volcanoes. There are an awful lot of good books out there and we can add one more to that list: Volcanoes: Global Perspectives” by Jack Lockwood and Rick Hazlett. I’ve…

The ash plume from Eyjafjallajökull, piercing the cloud deck above the volcano. Image courtesy of the Icelandic Met Office, taken on May 13, 2010. See the latest report on the eruption. With all the rapid fire news on eruptions as of late, combined with my busy schedule during the school year, I haven’t been able…

The eruption at Eyjafjallajökull-Fimmvörduháls continues on – the explosive spatter and bomb eruptions at the new central vent (on the second fissure) were impressive all night, making the hikers/cars/aircraft look like mites in comparison. This eruption has, so far, followed the pattern of Hawaiian-style volcanism quite well, so I thought it could be a good…

With all the talk of the current Yellowstone earthquake swarm, I thought it would worth it to write a post on the the structure and caldera – and why we get earthquake swarms that are structurally rather than magmatically-related. First off, lets think about why calderas formed. This is relatively simple – at least superficially.…