ERV does not have a monopoly on teh crazy.

Pal really reels them in with his chronic lyme disease posts, and now, evidently, chiro-woo.

I could not have made up this post from ‘Dr. Howard Boos‘ if I had tried.

You tell me this asshole doesnt sound EXACTLY like a Creationist or HIV Denier!
1. Hates science
2. Uses title of ‘Dr’ in an attempt to gain unearned credibility
3. Personal expertise/experience trumps scientific community
4. Little/No interest in modern scientific findings, eg journal articles
5. Scientific community wants to hurt people
6. Science itself hurts people
7. Woo makes people happy
8. Scientific community persecutes professional wooer
9. Desperate pleas for ‘civility’, btw, scientific community is made up of murderous Nazis who genuinely enjoy seeing children in pain

**LAUGH!!!**

When he signed ‘Tulsa, OK’, I thought Id look him up on the Google machine. Dude is totally a real human. A real batshit insane human. Not only is he a chiropractor, hes also a proud graduate of Oral Roberts, and according to Google, a ‘tax protester‘.

Though they might traditionally be sleepy government repositories, clerk’s offices are increasingly being used by fringe groups for antigovernment activism. In March, Howard Boos, an Oklahoma chiropractor and tax protester, was charged with filing in a clerk’s office a false $20 million lien against two IRS agents who were investigating him for evasion.

LOL, WUT? WUT???

Oh whatever. Lets go see what kind of fun facts we can learn on Dr. Apparently Antigovernments website:

Please know that I chose to be a chiropractor. I am not a medical doctor and I don’t pretend to be one.

Are you tired of drugging your body trying to fool it into thinking that everything is okay?

Ready to take advantage of all the wonderful life-saving and stress relieving benefits of chiropractic care but not sure where to begin? You’re in the right place!

“I brought my son, Franky, to Dr. Boos because of Franky’s asthma. His previous treatment included going to the hospital, spending five days, three to four shots a day, and breathing treatments every four hours. After five days of this, the asthma was gone but my son had lost a great deal of weight and was exhausted. This happened six to eight times every year of his life. I originally had doubts about chiropractic; I was skeptical for the first month or two of treatment. It took five to six months but Franky never goes to the hospital now.”

“From the time I was 16 years old, I had always had trouble with my voice. At least once a year, sometimes two or three times, I had laryngitis. It usually lasted two or three days. No big deal! One day my voice went out while I was sitting with a group of second graders in reading circle. After a week of not speaking and teaching, I began many trips to doctors and specialists. Each time they could find nothing physically wrong and attributed the laryngitis to stress… I eventually resigned my teaching position. One day, I went with my husband to see Dr. Boos. My husband’s back had gone out. After we had explained how long I had had laryngitis and the many doctor visits, Dr. Boos encouraged us to allow him to give me an adjustment. He was confident I would see improvement in my voice within 24 hours. He was right! After three adjustments, my voice returned. It was normal and full of volume. The laryngitis had lasted four days short of eight weeks.”

The word “Headache” simply means – ache in the head. It is NOT a disease. It is simply an ache. A pain. A symptom. I am not even remotely making light of it though – this symptom can be severe and debilitating. It is said that there are different types of headaches; migraines, cluster, tension, occipital, sinus, etc. All of them seem to have a different pattern, location, severity, and, of course drug, to deal with it.
This may come as a surprise to many of you, but this is a manufacturer’s reality. In other words, the pharmaceutical industry would like you to believe, and accept, the illusion that all of these headaches need to be treated. Why? Let’s see…There are billions of dollars of profit at stake. What a shock!
… As a profession we have found that the vast majority of headaches are simply signs of a vertebral subluxation – a distortion of some of the vertebrae of the neck area mostly affecting the function of the nervous system. You would be surprised to learn that 85-95% of all subluxations I see in adults and children, can be traced to a difficult delivery. We call this Traumatic Birth Syndrome.

Links: Markus Rothkranz “Never Be Sick Again

AAAAAAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHA!

Shorter Dr. Howie: “I dont pretend to be a doctor… BUT I CAN SAVE YOURE LIFE! I can cure asthma in 6 months, and laryngitis in THREE VISITS! Also, headaches are a big scam thought up by BIG PHARMA! Headaches are really the result of TRAUMATIC BIRTH SYNDROME, which no one recognizes but chiros. Also, I really like Markus Rothkranz. I mean, I really like Markus Rothkranz. *WINK!*”

What a friggen NUTBAR! AAAAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

Comments

  1. #1 Magnus
    June 23, 2009

    @Markus Rothkranz

    It’s amazing what a shaving, buying lenses, tanning, getting a haircut and freshening up your wardrobe can do to you looks… ahem, I meant health.

  2. #2 jon
    June 23, 2009

    W…..T…..F?

    People actually believe that some dude cracking your spine can cure asthma and laryngitis? PHYSIOLOGY FAIL!

  3. #3 bort
    June 23, 2009

    You definitely see the same types of lies and tricks from Boos as Creationists and HIV deniers. Psuedoscience is psuedoscience, no matter what hat it wears.

    That picture of the girl about to get an adjustment makes me sick

  4. #4 jon
    June 23, 2009

    Also, that picture cries out for photoshopping/captioning.

    OH EXPLOITABLE!

  5. #5 Paul Lundgren
    June 23, 2009

    That picture reminds me of Penn & Teller calling a chiropracter a “baby-twisting motherfucker” on “Penn & Teller–Bullshit!”

  6. #6 Optimus Primate
    June 23, 2009

    Abbie said:

    You tell me this asshole doesnt sound EXACTLY like a Creationist or HIV Denier!

    You forgot one, Abbie!

    10. Wouldn’t know a paragraph break if it bit him in the ass.

  7. #7 Sili
    June 23, 2009

    Well, it is rather inhumane not to wring the baby’s neck before cooking.

  8. #8 Prometheus
    June 23, 2009

    “I am just a man in an office caring for spines.”

    *places hands on hips*

    *slays dragon*

    Who writes like this?

    It’s like somebody rewrote a Superman comic book as a first person autobiography.

    He needs to hook up with CommonSense and fight crime.

  9. #9 Chayanov
    June 23, 2009

    In March, Howard Boos, an Oklahoma chiropractor and tax protester, was charged with filing in a clerk’s office a false $20 million lien against two IRS agents who were investigating him for evasion.

    I remember those kinds of nuts from when I worked in county government years ago. They also filed ridiculous documents that claimed things like the 14th Amendment didn’t apply to them. They paid their filing fees in coins because they didn’t trust paper money, and it was widely assumed that they stockpiled guns.

  10. #10 BeamStalk
    June 23, 2009

    That picture reminds me of Penn & Teller calling a chiropractor a “baby-twisting motherfucker” on “Penn & Teller–Bullshit!”

    - I was thinking exactly the same thing Paul. It also reminded of the assholes on that show that were working on babies whose bones hadn’t fully developed yet. Baby-twisting motherfucker might be too nice.

  11. #11 Joshua Zelinsky
    June 23, 2009

    This seems to be part of the general pattern that people who care strongly about one form of woo are likely to buy into others as well. It is a strange pattern. The tax protesters are really one of the craziest groups out there. At least most forms of fringe beliefs rest on the notion that somehow they are resting on how they think the universe actually works. But things like taxes are inherently social constructs. If no one agrees with you, you’re wrong.

  12. #12 Calli Arcale
    June 23, 2009

    Having had the occasion to get my toddler’s wrist x-rayed a week ago (a heavy window fell on it, and we were afraid it was broken — thankfully, it was not), I have now gone from “chiros who treat infants are moneygrubbing assholes” to “chiros who treat infants are freakin’ INSANE”. Many of the bones in an adult’s body don’t even exist when you’re an infant. These guys barely know adult anatomy; how can they possibly expect to understand a baby’s spine?

    And about the cure-asthma anecdote quoted above, it’s *hilarious* that he used the exact same anecdote when he addressed PalMD. Obviously, though his practice is based entirely on anecdote, he doesn’t have very many of them.

  13. #13 Prometheus
    June 23, 2009

    #11 Joshua Zelinsky

    “This seems to be part of the general pattern that people who care strongly about one form of woo are likely to buy into others as well.”

    This.

    I wonder about this a lot.

    Is Dean Hamer right about the god gene. Do they just have their neurochemical floodgates open or what?

    If they did a lot of cocaine, went to rehab and recovered would they return to their chiropractic clinics put their hands on a little kids neck and say “Wait a minute…What the hell was I thinking!”?

  14. #14 Tyler DiPietro
    June 23, 2009

    “Is Dean Hamer right about the god gene. Do they just have their neurochemical floodgates open or what?”

    I think it’s largely due to the fact that wooery has become a subculture for those who view themselves as anti-establishment. Thus they are drawn to anything that goes against “the mainstream” or “the orthodoxy”.

    Any possible neurochemical basis would probably be reducible to issues of temperament and personality. I notice that most people who comprise this group tend to be annoyingly contrarian and narcissistic.

  15. #15 Joshua Zelinsky
    June 23, 2009

    I think that one issue that is going on is that people who buy into one fringe belief are likely to be lacking in critical thinking skills and thus more likely to buy into other such beliefs (not all fringe beliefs are necessarily torn apart by critical thinking, but most are).

    Incidentally, the correlation of fringe beliefs isn’t purely anecdotal. There was a study recently that showed that people who believed in a government UFO cover up were much more likely to believe that 9/11 was a government conspiracy.

  16. #16 Prometheus
    June 23, 2009

    #14

    “I notice that most people who comprise this group tend to be annoyingly contrarian and narcissistic.”

    this too!

    but not so much with the ‘practitioners’/peddlers but with their ecstatic victims I see ALL of the cluster B personality disorders exhibited at once. My experience of the former is that they tend to be garden variety fabulist megalomaniacs.

  17. #17 Paul Lundgren
    June 23, 2009

    @Beamstalk,

    Penn Jillette actually had an interesting take on why they use such crude language on the show. It’s to avoid being sued for libel. You can call someone dirty names all you want, but the MINUTE you call someone a fraud, despite a mountain of evidence to the contrary, you’re ass will be hauled into court.

    And regarding that particular episode, Jillette said they had to leave some footage on the (digital) cutting room floor because it was too disturbing. THAT scares the hell out of me.

  18. #18 Paul Lundgren
    June 23, 2009

    Oops. I meant, “YOUR ass will be hauled into court.” I hate it when I mess up my apostrophes. [Are you listening, Abbie? :-)]

  19. #19 John C. Welch
    June 23, 2009

    The picture cries out for a good round of /b/ fun.

    “Well honey, we said that only good girls who got “A”s would be allowed to live in this house. Now hold still, Miss “B’s aren’t so bad”, this will only hurt for a second.”

  20. #20 Mobius
    June 23, 2009

    Tulsa, eh?

    Sadly, OKC does not have a monopoly on batshit crazy in Oklahoma.

  21. #21 revatheist
    June 24, 2009

    “the pharmaceutical industry would like you to believe, and accept, the illusion that all of these headaches need to be treated. Why? Let’s see…There are billions of dollars of profit at stake. What a shock!”
    Indeed, federally-regulated big pharma is only out for the money, whereas non-regulated big chiro does all it can out of the simple human kindness…..oh yeah, and for the billions you would have spent on actual tested medications.

  22. #22 mind over splatter
    June 24, 2009

    I didn’t know that they taught chiropractic at Oral Love U.

  23. #23 Mobius
    June 24, 2009

    BTW…I was thinking of Sally Kern and some of her Republican colleagues and the silliness they have been up to the last year.

  24. #24 BeamStalk
    June 24, 2009

    Thanks for reminding me Paul. It has been awhile since I have seen that episode. Makes sense, although I think chiropractic care on a small child should be illegal. Hell it should all be illegal but one step at a time.

  25. #25 Prometheus
    June 24, 2009

    I think it was this guy’s father and brother that tried to sue Muskogee Hospital to get chiros “physician privileges”.

    That would have been in the sixties when a decision by the OK Supremes resulted in a good laugh being had by all save the House of Boosi.

    If you are really interested I will try and find the case and link it.

    I also have an old edition of their founder’s insane book “The Chiropractor” in the law library among some tracts about white slavery and descriptions of patented ant-masturbation equipment.

    I love me some fin de siècle woo.

    He probably plagiarized the whole thing from that Civil War surgeon who shuffled around the osteopathic ‘school’ in Kirksville, Mo. wearing waders and carrying a pole because he had hysterical ophidiophobia.

    The Midwest rocks.

  26. #26 Trollmaximus
    June 24, 2009

    Dear Folks,
    I respect everyone’s commitment on this blog to providing care to help the sick and suffering. That’s what this whole discussion is about, right?
    I hope so.
    I have practiced witchcraft-doctor for 30 years. I am just a warlock in a hut fighting evil demons. Admittedly, I rarely review the current literature to find out if the spells I am offering are considered “scientific”. I do frequently attend solstices and go naked into the woods to find out from fellow spirits, witches and warlocks what they have found to work. Certainly not at all what you would consider a “scientific” approach. I just know that I have seen countless cases over the years as parents have brought in their children between “scientific” visits to the hospital because they were suffering from a demonic possession. Hospital visits that sometimes last 5 to 7 days while their son or daughter is given massive doses of “scientific” steroids, for a non-existing “disease” that is simply a demonic usurping! During those visits the child will generally lose 5% of their body weight. The parents and child will all come in to my hut looking worn out, the child still demonically possessed. The child’s obviously worn out because it’s extremely difficult to sleep when demons have taken your body and the kid has to fight just to breath; the parents looking equally worn out because it’s extremely hard to sleep knowing your child is suffering, because of demons. And, when these parents entrust me with the care of their I child, and I gently exorcise the demons within, by invoking the spirits of the woodland beasts and giving him potions, releasing the demons and tension the child carries. They relax. They smile. The parents smile. I then seal the child, because I believe (whether it’s passes what you would consider a double blind study or not) that after that, the demons will no longer usurp the child’s body, and then we all watch as the child gets better. Not once, or twice, but over and over again, I see suffering children respond and get better in my hut. Does every child respond? No, but the vast majority in my hut do. Do the demons ever return? Yes. Do the demon attacks return at the same frequency? No, most of the time they don’t. Most of the time they no longer require the use of anti-demon face mask. I’ve seen this. I know this from direct experience. Yes, I know this is “merely anecdotal”. But, knowing what I know, I won’t and can’t refuse care to those children that suffer until some type of study can be done so I can get the rest of the world’s approval. I would rather see them respond “anecdotally” than suffer “scientifically”. What’s odd is that what I do is considered “bogus” for those that I’ve helped, while the “scientific” community can prescribe all the antibiotics and surgically implant countless tubes in the ears of children that fail a vast majority of the time. The bottom line is that if the practice of “scientific” medicine held all the answers parents wouldn’t continue to carry their children into my hut for care. So, until then, I want to use my time in helping the sick and demonically possessed.
    Again, I respect your intentions of providing what you believe the best health care to humanity. I would appreciate, but after 30 years I don’t anticipate, that same respect. We have evolved as a society to where we know it’s wrong to libel someone because of their skin color, but it’s still fine to libel someone because of they see a different approach to health care, and demon exorcism.

  27. #27 Mike Caton
    June 24, 2009

    It’s primo, gourmet crazy like this that makes me jealous of you Oklahomans. Nowhere else is teh crazy so authentic. Is it the tornados?

    That chiro’s, homeopaths, creationists, AIDS-deniers, etc. fall into these same patterns is useful. Next time you’re in an online debate, instead of offering another fact that the creationist can misunderstand, do this little rhetorical 180: ask them how they’re different from a moon-hoaxer, or a vaccines-cause-autism nut (the further from their political leanings, the better.) Amazingly enough, the creationist will often consider chiro, homeopathy, Truth-Outers to be just as looney as you do. At the very least, this confuses them.

    Trollmaximus: good job. I read your post before I saw the Crazy Chiro’s, so his snake oil didn’t even have the initial sheen of credibility he tries to give it. Switching out individual terms is a great way to “wake people up” to teh crazy. Sam Harris also uses it to great effect.

  28. #28 RayvenAlandria
    June 26, 2009

    The kook works close to me! HALP!!! I’m surrounded by teh crazy!

  29. #29 Monado
    July 2, 2009

    “…the pharmaceutical industry would like you to believe, and accept, the illusion that all of these headaches need to be treated. Why? Let’s see…There are billions of dollars of profit at stake.”

    “Oh, Dr. Wooooo, I’m so glad you’re treating me for free, unlike those money-grubbing doctors!”

    LOL

  30. #30 Barklikeadog
    July 2, 2009

    “…the pharmaceutical industry would like you to believe, and accept, the illusion that all of these headaches need to be treated. Why? Let’s see…There are billions of dollars of profit at stake.”

    Big Pharma tells me my headaches need to be treated MY ASS!! ‘I’ tell me my headache needs to be treated. I’m too fucking miserable if I don’t. & thank Dog for Big Pharma too. I’d of shot myself if they didn’t have migraine medicine.

  31. #31 Barklikeadog
    July 2, 2009

    Trollmaximus; proprietor of Demon Hut. $5.00 gets you a medium with a coke.

  32. #32 ethan
    July 4, 2009

    You might notice if you use the “google machine” that this is Dr. Howard J. Boos – the tax evader is Dr. Howard M. Boos (deceased, also according to the “google machine”). One would assume that these are different people, unless Dr. Howard M. Boos is writing to us from the grave.

    ERV, if you calling somebody Hysterical isn’t the pot calling the kettle black, I have no idea what is.

    You make some hysterical and completely unfounded claims. You infer that truth should reign supreme but could hardly write a true sentence if your pathetic life depended on it.

    Some of your claims about Dr. Boos that border on either psychotic or libelous (both?):

    1. Hates science
    -Where did you come up with this notion? – have you not fully grasped the English language? He doesn’t hate science; he hates “science”, as in pseudo-science. If you’d ever read anything about Chiropractic you’d know that even the AMA accepts Chiropractic as scientifically proven to be beneficial for back pain. I would assume that somebody who makes his living “cracking backs” would appreciate the credit from the scientific community.

    2. Uses title of ‘Dr’ in an attempt to gain unearned credibility
    -Again, the American Medical Institute and the United States Government (Medicare, Medicaid, etc.) recognize a degree as a Doctor (“Dr.” for short) of Chiropractic. I believe that means it is “earned” credibility, not “unearned”.

    3. Personal expertise/experience trumps scientific community
    -Personal experience always trumps scientific community if you’re a rational human. Would you believe the scientific community over your own personal experience? Remember, this is the same scientific community that can’t tell you whether eggs are good for you, bad for you, or part good/part bad. It is also the same community that has been prescribing drugs like propoxyphene for over 50 years and has only recently taken it off the market.

    4. Little/No interest in modern scientific findings, eg journal articles
    -Because someone isn’t interested in reading articles on whether chiropractic is scientific or not, it means that they are uninterested in all scientific findings? That sounds like a logical fallacy to me. Perhaps you shouldn’t be so careless in your criticism.

    5. Scientific community wants to hurt people
    -Again, you might try and pay attention to those quotation marks.

    6. Science itself hurts people
    -Those pesky quotes again… And, I’m quite sure that there is nowhere that this is either explicitly or implicitly stated – perhaps you’re just reading a little too much into things.

    7. Woo makes people happy
    -While you may be ignorant of the science and the studies, there are quite a few studies in The Journal of Medicine and other medical journals, especially in Europe, that scientifically support the use of Chiropractic medicine. In fact, if you’re ever in Italy and need to see a Chiro you can just take a quick trip to a hospital where you’re sure to find one employed.

    8. Scientific community persecutes professional wooer
    -Yeah, you got this one right – up to now, you’re 1 for 8, way to go!!! I couldn’t think of any reasons why they would, either… And it’s very clear that it’s not about money – just ask AstraZeneca about Crestor. Then ask the FDA about Baycol.

    9. Desperate pleas for ‘civility’, btw, scientific community is made up of murderous Nazis who genuinely enjoy seeing children in pain
    -Yeah, civility is for losers – we’d be much better off if some lame blogger made false claims about somebody based on psychotic inference.

    ERV, you got a little hysterical about this topic – you should either go get a life or take a Serzone – on second thought, maybe that’s not such a good idea… On third thought, maybe it is.

  33. #33 Howard Boos
    July 4, 2009

    ERV,
    Wow! You need to get a life my friend.
    I wrote my post several days ago and have been busy caring for the sick and suffering in the real world who have grown disillusioned with “science”, while you’ve been doing whatever is you do inside a lab.
    By the way, I use the quotations because so much of what passes as what you consider “science” is anything but real science.
    “ERV”, one might think that you have a bit too much time on your hands. You had to have spent well over an hour on me. I’m honored. You even included my deceased father’s tax problems.
    I have to point out that it appears that you might appear a bit on the fearful side as you remain nameless and without a real physical address.
    Are you frightened? It’s apparent to many that I’ve really frightened your crumbling belief system.
    Would you please provide me with you real name and address? I would love to have you, or anyone that’s posted, as a guest on my radio show so we can actually talk “face to face”. My phone number is 918-749-2992. What’s yours?
    Sincerely,
    Dr. Howard Boos

  34. #34 Ethan
    July 4, 2009

    While you may not put much stock into what chiropractors do, it seems like some people in the medical profession do:

    http://www.cancercenter.com/southwestern-hospital/doctors-clinicians/howard-boos.cfm

  35. #35 somebody's mom
    July 4, 2009

    You silly hate-mongering bloggers. Did your mothers not breast feed you long enough? Do you need a nap? There exists ginormous unprovoked bile and flat out rambling inacuracy in your attacks on Dr. Boos. Climb out of your self-imposed lab rat life and take a walk on the live side. It is clear you have not investigated your statements. And what do you care if it isn’t religiously scientific if people are getting well? And they are. You could use a little wellness, yourselves, I think. Dr. Boos does read the literature. He doesn’t need it to be certain about his life’s work but he reads it. Healing comes from above, down, inside out. The brain controls all structure and function via the nerve system. Go bitch at Gray’s if you don’t like it. I just bet Dr. Boos reads more than your solitary dim desk lamp allows you.

  36. #36 somebody's mom
    July 4, 2009

    I would like to apologize for my recent comments about breast feeding. I’m sure that when you were born, someone convinced your mother that breast feeding wasn’t the way to go. It certainly wasn’t considered good for you by the prevailing scientific wisdom. Chemically fabricated and enhanced formula WAS the way to make you smart and healthy. Please accept my apologies… Or were you a thalidimide baby? I shudder.

  37. #37 Bronze Dog
    July 4, 2009

    W…..T…..F?

    People actually believe that some dude cracking your spine can cure asthma and laryngitis? PHYSIOLOGY FAIL!

    Something of a “chiropractic spit-take” in action. :) Yes, I was also surprised to learn that chiropractors often made such crazy claims when I first looked at the Skeptics’ Dictionary. See also the “homeopathic spit-take” when someone learns the “herbal” homeopathic remedies are diluted into nonexistence, yet are supposed to be stronger with greater dilution.

    As for the trolls who’ve infested the thread with “get a life” line: Don’t you think you should try something more convincing than “LOL, you’re stupid and emotional enough to hate fraud, suffering, and injustice?! Emotions make you weak!”

    Believe me, I despise cynical, nihilistic people like you, who can only tear things down for shits and giggles. Try a more productive approach.

  38. #38 Tyler DiPietro
    July 5, 2009

    I see we’ve got some seriously fucking butthurt chiro-wooers here. Surprised it took them this long to find us. And as always, get classic stupidity:

    “If you’d ever read anything about Chiropractic you’d know that even the AMA accepts Chiropractic as scientifically proven to be beneficial for back pain.

    And as we all know, this is automatically applicable when someone is advertising with testimonials from people saying it cured their asthma and laryngitis.

    Retard.

    “Personal experience always trumps scientific community if you’re a rational human.”

    No, a rational humans recognizes the inherent fallibility of anecdote when compared to more rigorous empirical science.

    Double Retard.

  39. #39 Bronze Dog
    July 6, 2009

    Thanks, Tyler, for pointing out a line I was too furious to notice:

    “Personal experience always trumps scientific community if you’re a rational human.”

    Part of being rational is knowing that you’re a fallible mortal with cognitive biases and flawed senses. Personal experience with worth shit if it doesn’t withstand scientific scrutiny.

    Science exists to keep all our flaws and biases in check. We invented science because we’re aware of being flawed. But these nutbars would throw out science because it doesn’t feed their ego and delusions of being above us mere mortals.

    News flash woos: YOU ARE NOT GODS! You are not inherently, magically superior to us. How many elephants did you have to kill to build that ivory tower of yours?

  40. #40 Prometheus
    July 6, 2009

    Rock and Roll!

    #33 The Mighty Boos……Holy Crap

    That’s awesome Howard!

    ERV has a life. It is not underwritten by blatant parasitism on the desperate, stupid or the taxi slapping shills of unctuous shysters. You don’t care for the sick or suffering. You alleviate suffering the same way a tape worm alleviates that feeling of being too full.

    ~“By the way, I use the quotations because so much of what passes as what you consider “science” is anything but real science.”~

    By the way, you use them because you lack basic skills in English composition.

    The rest is priceless

    ~“Blah blah blah blah, I’m lonely. Give Doctor Boos your phone number. I’m on the radio. Love me ! Take me seriously!”~

    You gotta pay to play Howard. Answer some questions. Gratify the Hive Mind!

    Is it true that the founder of Chiropractic attached magnets to old men’s testicles?

    Do you oppose fluoridation and vaccines?

    Does it bother you that the Greek words, kheir and praxis (chiropractic) do not mean “done by hand”.

    It could translate very literally as “hand job”or “fingered”.

    In medieval liturgical Greek (praktikos) as “handy handbook”

    or in classical Greek as “directly manipulating the political system”: to wit “Bribery”

    Digression: Praxis is a beautiful word. You should read what Aristotle did with it some time.

    How is asthma caused by a misalignment of the spine? Be specific.

    Have you considered a Christian Chiropractic Mission would free up a lot of time and coin?

    Do you resent the Palmers for not going with their first instinct and having Chiropractic declared a religion?

    #34 and 35 somebody’s mom;

    1. is fat

    2. was sexually aroused by breast feeding her child.

    3. has a house full of crap. Not just cluttered but “I’ve got an empty empty womb” full to the mother f*cking ceiling.

  41. #41 BAllanJ
    July 7, 2009

    I think the wooishness of chiro is differently expressed in different countries. Here in Canada I think it’s relatively benign, but not totally so. I don’t think they say they cure asthma, but will have a go at anything skeletal or muscular.

    But,,,, the world here is divided into 2 groups… those that never go to a chiropractor, and those who go to one once a week for. the. rest. of. their. liiiiives! Cure?!

  42. #42 prometheus
    July 7, 2009

    I have a friend who is a GP in Alberta. Chiros claim anecdotal successes in the treatment of asthma, migraines, lupus, PMS, Allergies, drug addiction, chronic fatigue associated with cancer treatment etc etc.

    The far flung shceduling issues make Canadians particularly vulnerable to “alternatives” and private clinics that are playing hell with the system.

    Canada is a leader in the field of veterinary chiropractic if you think your bunnies are misaligned.

    http://www.veterinarychiropractic.ca/graduates.htm

  43. #43 Howard Boos
    July 16, 2009

    “Erv” (I have to use “ERV” because you don’t use your real name),
    And, against my better judgement, I’m back and I have read all of you scholarly folks’ very “kind” responses to my sincere desire for dialogue on the blog (even the slamming my daughter; way to go -that’s classy).
    I ignorantly thought that we could discuss our viewpoints in a civilized manner. You are right, I am ignorant.
    I know that you all have incredible passion for what you believe to be true and I truly admire that.
    But, “ERV”, I hope to hell that you know that results are what counts. Please know that. RESULTS COUNT “ERV”. While you sit in your lab without a living person present, PLEASE KNOW THAT RESULTS ARE IT.
    Come and visit my office with recorders running and interview anyone you would like. I know you live in Oklahoma. It would be a short trip. Hell, I’ll buy you lunch. I’LL COME PICK YOU UP.
    You talk a big game, so I know you are not afraid, are you? You would then have tons of material to rip the “dumb unscientific quack chiropractor.” Bring your camera.
    It will be great reading for your flock of believers. Why don’t you come?
    “ERV”, I have three children and a ton of patients who are healthy, happy and thriving without one single prescription drug because chiropractic care works.
    DO YOU NOT GET THAT IT’S RESULTS ARE WHAT COUNTS? ARE PEOPLE BRAIN DEAD? I HOPE NOT BECAUSE PEOPLE’S LIVES ARE AT STAKE!!!
    If I am so dangerous why do I see 40 to 100 patients a day over the last 30 years with a malpractice premium of $1,240 per year?
    Stop drinking the Kool-Aid of Orthodox Medicine Religion Kool-Aid, ERV. If science were embodied in a human being it would roll over in it’s grave when orthodox medicine rolls out a new drug that has absolutely no more merit than an omega 3 fish oil yet calls it “scientific”.
    WAKE UP FOLKS!!!
    I’ve tried not to keep this personal, but are you folks brain dead?
    I don’t take one prescription drug “ERV”, how many prescription medicines are you on “ERV”?
    I await your call.

  44. #44 Howard Boos
    July 16, 2009

    “Erv” (I have to use “ERV” because you don’t use your real name),
    And, against my better judgement, I’m back and I have read all of you scholarly folks’ very “kind” responses to my sincere desire for dialogue on the blog (even the slamming my daughter; way to go -that’s classy).
    I ignorantly thought that we could discuss our viewpoints in a civilized manner. You are right, I am ignorant.
    I know that you all have incredible passion for what you believe to be true and I truly admire that.
    But, “ERV”, I hope to hell that you know that results are what counts. Please know that. RESULTS COUNT “ERV”. While you sit in your lab without a living person present, PLEASE KNOW THAT RESULTS ARE IT.
    Come and visit my office with recorders running and interview anyone you would like. I know you live in Oklahoma. It would be a short trip. Hell, I’ll buy you lunch. I’LL COME PICK YOU UP.
    You talk a big game, so I know you are not afraid, are you? You would then have tons of material to rip the “dumb unscientific quack chiropractor.” Bring your camera.
    It will be great reading for your flock of believers. Why don’t you come?
    “ERV”, I have three children and a ton of patients who are healthy, happy and thriving without one single prescription drug because chiropractic care works.
    DO YOU NOT GET THAT IT’S RESULTS ARE WHAT COUNTS? ARE PEOPLE BRAIN DEAD? I HOPE NOT BECAUSE PEOPLE’S LIVES ARE AT STAKE!!!
    If I am so dangerous why do I see 40 to 100 patients a day over the last 30 years with a malpractice premium of $1,240 per year?
    Stop drinking the Kool-Aid of Orthodox Medicine Religion, ERV. If science were embodied in a human being it would roll over in it’s grave when orthodox medicine rolls out a new drug that has absolutely no more merit than an omega 3 fish oil yet calls it “scientific”.
    WAKE UP FOLKS!!!
    I’ve tried not to keep this personal, but are you folks brain dead?
    I don’t take one prescription drug “ERV”, how many prescription medicines are you on “ERV”?
    I await your call.

  45. #45 ERV
    July 16, 2009

    Sorry, Boos. Bad timing. Normally my commentors would be all over that shit (aw, and you really brought teh crazy too! they would LOVE THIS!), but we are busy with a blogwar right now.

    Should have responded faster.

    Internet moves fast, man. Keep up.

  46. #46 minimalist
    July 16, 2009

    Booze writes like a man with about 15-18 restraining orders on him. Golly, why WOULDN’T Abbie want to meet this man personally?

    (PS You still don’t really understand science, Booze honey. Anecdotes *still* aren’t reliable, even less so testimonials from marks who’ve been funneling money into your pockets every week for years.)

  47. #47 Howard Boos
    July 16, 2009

    No restraining orders “minimalist” (person with no name).
    Check my background. What’s yours? You folks are fun. Abbie, you can come to.

  48. #48 Tyler DiPietro
    July 16, 2009

    Oh Jesus Christ, go have another drink asshole. We’re in the middle of a internecine flame war, as you can plainly see. We’ll give in to your attention whoring later.

  49. #49 Prometheus
    July 16, 2009

    Hi Doctor Howard.

    Answer my questions please.

    I’ll send you a lollipop bouquet.

    *blushes with love for Midwestern woo*

  50. #50 red rabbit
    August 2, 2009

    I’ll bite.

    How about this, Mr. Boos?

    But what about chiropractic in the context of treating back problems? Manipulating the spine can cure some problems, but results are mixed. To be fair, conventional approaches, such as physiotherapy, also struggle to treat back problems with any consistency. Nevertheless, conventional therapy is still preferable because of the serious dangers associated with chiropractic.

    In 2001, a systematic review of five studies revealed that roughly half of all chiropractic patients experience temporary adverse effects, such as pain, numbness, stiffness, dizziness and headaches. These are relatively minor effects, but the frequency is very high, and this has to be weighed against the limited benefit offered by chiropractors.

    More worryingly, the hallmark technique of the chiropractor, known as high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust, carries much more significant risks. This involves pushing joints beyond their natural range of motion by applying a short, sharp force. Although this is a safe procedure for most patients, others can suffer dislocations and fractures.

    Worse still, manipulation of the neck can damage the vertebral arteries, which supply blood to the brain. So-called vertebral dissection can ultimately cut off the blood supply, which in turn can lead to a stroke and even death. Because there is usually a delay between the vertebral dissection and the blockage of blood to the brain, the link between chiropractic and strokes went unnoticed for many years. Recently, however, it has been possible to identify cases where spinal manipulation has certainly been the cause of vertebral dissection.

    Laurie Mathiason was a 20-year-old Canadian waitress who visited a chiropractor 21 times between 1997 and 1998 to relieve her low-back pain. On her penultimate visit she complained of stiffness in her neck. That evening she began dropping plates at the restaurant, so she returned to the chiropractor. As the chiropractor manipulated her neck, Mathiason began to cry, her eyes started to roll, she foamed at the mouth and her body began to convulse. She was rushed to hospital, slipped into a coma and died three days later. At the inquest, the coroner declared: “Laurie died of a ruptured vertebral artery, which occurred in association with a chiropractic manipulation of the neck.”

    This case is not unique. In Canada alone there have been several other women who have died after receiving chiropractic therapy, and Edzard Ernst has identified about 700 cases of serious complications among the medical literature. This should be a major concern for health officials, particularly as under-reporting will mean that the actual number of cases is much higher.

    If spinal manipulation were a drug with such serious adverse effects and so little demonstrable benefit, then it would almost certainly have been taken off the market.

    Excerpt from an article by Simon Singh, author for the Guardian

    Do you deny that vertebral artery dissection is a risk of chiropractic manipulation? Do you routinely inform your patients of this?

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