Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for January, 2006

Talk amongst yourselves.

I’m hammering away at the next edition of Tangled Bank (going up tomorrow) — plus, you know, teaching and stuff — but I wanted to give you a little something to work on. From New Scientist: YOU could be forgiven for thinking that scientific fraud was in fashion. Weeks after the cloning superstar Woo Suk…

“Hush your mouth!”

[I'm blogging on this at the request of my mom, who also requests that I try not to blog so blue.] As Chris, among others, has noted, there’s a piece in the Washington Post about global warming. The piece includes an all-too-familiar feature: the government scientist (here James E. Hansen of NASA’s Goddard Institute of…

Being identified as “pro-science” is pretty cool, given that some people get the idea (from my kvetching about ethics) that I’m against science. (I’m against sloppy or dishonest methodology masquerading as science, but that doesn’t make me an enemy of science.) But that was about the only part of the widely distributed ID survey that…

Who’s duping whom?

Today in the Chronicle of Higher Education there’s a piece on Gerald Schatten’s role in the Korean stem cell mess. It’s an interesting piece, written without Dr. Schatten’s participation — he’s keeping quiet while the University of Pittsburgh conducts its investigation of him. (Worth noting, from the article: “Pittsburgh began investigating Mr. Schatten, at his…

Elder offspring (age 6.5): I can’t wait for Friday! We get to do science in school! Younger offspring (age 4.5): We do nature study every day. Dr. Free-Ride: That’s because you don’t have standardized tests yet, or the science would get crowded out by all the other stuff on the test. Elder offspring: We’re learning…

Taking it personally

Today I had my first (non-virtual) class meetings of the spring semester. There’s nothing like having every available seat filled and then having folks stream in to sit on the floor to make an academic feel popular. (Of course, in the past, a significant portion of those who have gotten add-codes have then disappeared until…

In one short week (on February 1, 2006), there will be a new edition of the Tangled Bank, hosted here at Adventures in Ethics and Science. Tangled Bank is a blog carnival of the best science writing (broadly construed) in the blogosphere. In previous editions, topics have ranged across many scientific disciplines and have included…

Via Evolgen, an article by Nicholas Wade on tools to recognize doctored images that accompany scientific manuscripts. Perhaps because “seeing is believing,” pictures (including visual presentations of data) have been a favored weapon in the scientist’s persuasive arsenal. But this means, as we know, that just as images can persuade, they can also deceive. The…

Outsourcing research

Every now and then, I take a moment to read my unsolicited commercial email before binning it. (Note to eMarketers: This moment is generally used to mock and deride the goods and/or services offered in the unsolicited commercial email. Take me off your stupid mailing lists!) The other day, I came upon a message offering…

Welcome Koufax voters!

I’m excited to be one of the many fine nominees for the “Best New Blog” Koufax Award for 2005. Because I know you want to make an informed decision about your vote (or, you know, put off doing actual work for a little while), here’s a quick tour of my posts back at the pre-ScienceBlogs…