Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for April, 2006

Uninvited nest update.

Yesterday I asked for advice about how to deal with a nest of eggs that presents itself in an inopportune place (a tree slated to meet a gruesome end in a whisper-chipper) at an inopportune time (mere days ahead of when we finally launch our backyard overhaul). The consensus among commenters who professed knowledge of…

I need to call on the collective wisdom of the internets to address an issue in my back yard. We have this tree in our back yard. It’s a pretty awful tree. It was probably a living Christmas tree that the people who lived here before us planted, but it’s in a really bad location…

Cue the theme song.

Via GrrlScientist, the precisely calibrated quiz for determining theme songs yields the following for me:

Last weekend, the Free-Ride family sat down to watch a nature program together: Nature: The Queen of Trees. The program looked at the variety of life around a giant fig tree. The central “relationship” in the program was between the tree and a wasp. From the program description: The wasp and the fig depend on…

The grading is unrelenting. The crud is not entirely cleared from my system. I still owe you the promised post on plagiarism. Must be time for a meme (specifically, the ABC meme, which I saw at jo(e)’s)!

Although certain bloggers of my acquaintance are suspicious of Emily Dickinson, I think she’s the bee’s knees. It wouldn’t be National Poetry Month without a selection from Emily. In case you’re hesitating about clicking “Read on”, I will entertain, in the comments, a discussion of whether the position Miss Dickinson advocates in the poem is…

Even though it’s outside the realm of science, given its relevance to recent discussions here, I just can’t leave this story alone: Via Nanopolitan, the latest on the sad case of Harvard sophomore and author(?) Kaavya Viswanathan, whose situation keeps unravelling. Viswanathan got herself a book contract while still a high school student, and then…

33rd Skeptics’ Circle

Would Coturnix really present the latest Skeptics’ Circle as a research report — with a title with a colon in it? You’ll have to pop over to Science and Politics to find out.

A couple posts ago I posed these questions: What do you want lay people to have as part of their store of scientific knowledge? What piece of scientific knowledge have you found especially useful, or would you like to have if you don’t already? Among other things, my query prompted this response from commenter tbell1:…

Chemists can be quite a literary bunch. Consider Primo Levi. Carl Djerassi. And, of course, Nobel Prize – winning chemist Roald Hoffman. Below the fold, Hoffman’s poem “An unusual state of matter”: