Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for May, 2006

Yesterday, I returned home after an excellent five days in Stockholm, discussing philosophy of chemistry with philosophers of chemistry, eating as many lingonberries as I could manage, and trying not to wake up instantly when light started pouring through the curtains at 4 AM. It was a good time. My last night there, we decided…

After some discussion with the younger Free-Ride offspring, I discovered that she does not know one dinosaur or dinosaur-related song; she knows three. And, because I asked nicely, now so do I.

Some of you with lives tied to the academic calendar have been done for awhile. Others may still be heading for the finish line. In either case, I’m willing to bet some of you have seen some cheating. The term is when we deal with practical matters of the prevention and punishment of cheating. The…

The future of humanity?

It’s “Ask a ScienceBlogger” time again, and the question of the week is whether the human race will be around in 100 years. Folks, I don’t want to get all Clintonian on you (William Jefferson, not George), but I’m going to have to say, it depends what you mean by “human”.

Today is one of those days. The younger Free-Ride offspring is a prime number again. (Indeed, she’s a prime number that is the sum of the two prime numbers before it.) The earth has orbited the sun (or vice versa, for my Ptolemaic readers) five times since she arrived on the scene.

The author unaware.

When non-scientists think about the big ethical issues in the practice of science (beyond questions of how much freedom scientists should have with the tax-payers’ money, and whether scientists ought to be “playing God”), they usually think about the three mortal sins of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Thought the big three happen, for most scientists…

Because (primary) election season is almost upon us, one’s mind sometimes turns to thoughts of coalition building. And sometimes, you can find allies in places you wouldn’t normally think to look. For example …

When the weather gets nice, a sprog’s thoughts turn to rocketry. Photos of the first mission of the bottle-rocket season after the jump.

Welcome to Teaching Carnival #9. I realize that you, gentle reader, may be affiliated with a school whose term has already ended. You may be easing into those first intoxicating weeks of the summer break, where your “to do” list seems more theoretical and less urgent. Academic calendars are somewhat arbitrary, so I know it’s…

The continuing saga of the uninvited nest seems to have come to an end. The hatchlings have died.