Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for May, 2007

A few announcements.

The Society of Women Engineers is hosting an event on June 3rd that may be of interest to girls (or their parents) in the Twin Cities area: On June 3rd, hundreds of girls in St. Paul, Minnesota will attend an event hosted by SWE called, “Wow! That’s Engineering!” Through hands-on activities, girls will learn how…

Commencement LOLdrums

I want to lay this at Julie’s feet, or maybe John Lynch’s, but I’m starting to think the LOLcats are taking over! My kids speak to each other in LOL dialect, and I’ve been mentally captioning … well, everything. My internal dialogue from part of commencement transcribed below. If you know a good deprogrammer, please…

Perhaps you heard Steve Inskeep’s interview with NASA administrator Michael Griffin on Morning Edition this morning. Perhaps you also are trying to tease out the logical consequences of this statement he made about climate change: I have no doubt that … a trend of global warming exists. I am not sure that it is fair…

Although this question is somewhat connected to issues from the previous post, it’s a question I’ve been meaning to put out there for some time:

In the May 18th issue of Science, there’s a nice review by Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg [1] of the literature from developmental psychology that bears on the question of why adults in the U.S. are stubbornly resistant to certain scientific ideas. Regular readers will guess that part of my interest in this research…

Having finished grading (yea, having submitted the final grades themselves), I attempt to resurface from my cave. It’s really rather bright out here! Anyway, as you will have deduced from my last post, there was a commencement-sized break in my grading activities on Saturday. The commencement speaker, Google senior vice president of global sales and…

A commencement story.

Ahem. Beach ball here! Kids, I’m not going to march myself into the stadium! That’s better. Thanks dude!

Since folks in the U.S. have a long weekend, and because the last entry was younger-offspring-centric, you get a bonus Sprog Blog. Elder offspring: (following up a request at breakfast for a slice of bagel with avocado spread on it) It’s not brown avocado, is it? Dr. Free-Ride: No, it’s just ripe and freshly spooned…

A conversation with the younger Free-Ride offspring at the elder Free-Ride offspring’s soccer practice this week: Dr. Free-Ride: Hey, can you tell me about the science you’ve learned in kindergarten this year? Younger offspring: No. Dr. Free-Ride: Why not? Younger offspring: We haven’t really learned any science yet. Dr. Free-Ride: Child, it’s almost June! If…

This post brought to you by my intense desire to avoid grading any more papers. More than a dozen years ago, when I earned my Ph.D. in chemistry, I made what many at the time viewed as a financially reckless decision and purchased academic regalia rather than just renting it.