Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for July, 2007

Today a number of doctors affiliated with the nonprofit Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) filed suit against the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) alleging that state funds are paying for research that violates the Animal Welfare Act. Among the big concerns raised in the suit: Experiments that were “duplicative” — i.e., whose outcomes…

An old friend turned up to comment on my post about juggling, and as a woman in academia she has some familiarity with the metaphor and with the reality it’s supposed to capture. She writes: The department chair when I was hired … suggested that although we’re juggling lots of balls, the ball representing our…

Friday, my better half was preparing to cross the international dateline for a week-long business trip and my parents were getting ready to board a plane for a week-long visit at Casa Free-Ride. As I contemplated the prospect of digging out our guest room (known in these parts as “the place clean clothes go to…

Chad and Rob have already noted this piece of news about soon-to-be-published research indicating that the order in which high school students are taught physics, chemistry, and biology makes very little difference to their performance in science classes at the college level, while a rigorous math curriculum in high school gives their college science performance…

During one of our recent visits to The Tech Museum, we ran across a fun hands-on activity. The pretty purplish circle pictured here is what the younger Free-Ride offspring produced in this activity. The kids thought they were just doing an art project. But there’s science in that art. The art project works using the…

Dr. Free-Ride: What do you guys want to discuss this afternoon? Younger offspring: The human body. Elder offspring: Yeah, how the human body works. Dr. Free-Ride: Um, you guys know that “how the human body works” is a huge subject that we will never get through before dinner, right? You’re going to have to settle…

Currently on Wikipedia, there’s a stub that’s trying to become an entry about ScienceBlogs. And I can’t help noticing that you’re reading a ScienceBlogs blog. (Nice shirt, by the way — it really suits you!) So possibly you have some idea of what kind of information might be useful to the person turning to Wikipedia…

Today, Inside Higher Ed has an article about the recent decline of peer reviewed papers authored by professors in top five economics departments in high profile economics journals. A paper by MIT economics professor Glenn Ellison, “Is Peer Review in Decline?,” considers possible explanations for this decline, and the Inside Higher ed article looks at…

The news today from Inside Higher Ed is that the University of Colorado Board of Regents voted to fire Ward Churchill. You may recall that in May 2006, a faculty panel at the university found that the tenured ethnic studies professor had committed repeated, intentional academic misconduct in his scholarly writings. You may also recall…

I’ve been getting word (via carrier pigeon, mostly) that some of your favorite ScienceBloggers are just itching to provide you with fabulous new posts. However, a series of massive power outages in San Francisco Tuesday afternoon seem to have given the interwebs some hiccups. When the series of tubes is properly connected, they’ll be back.…