Adventures in Ethics and Science

Jennifer is another reader who made a generous donation to one of the projects in my challenge. She wrote:

I felt like I definitely needed
a piece of art work from your very talented crew. … I’d like
something in the style of Dr. Seuss about reptiles with some
accompanying artwork.

I’ve done my best to get my Seuss on. (This is one of those instances where it’s clear how much more talented my offspring are than I!) This goes out to Jennifer with our sincere thanks for her donation.

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Look there! Pressed up against the glass
A brave member of the Sauropsida class
(Whose orders four include squamata,
testudines who swim in water,
crocodilia who glide through brackish swamp
and sphenodontia that in New Zealand stomp).

These tetrapods do swim or lumber
With limbs that come in constant number.
Always there are four precise.
(In this way tetrapods are nice.)

Their skin is thick and pretty scaly,
Seals moisture ‘gainst weather windy and haily.
So unlike amphibians they have the choice
Between staying dry or being moist.

As ectotherms (so I’ve been told)
They mope around when it gets cold.
Their body temperature is fickle
When winter winds begin to tickle.

Unlike mammals, the food they eat
Is really no good source of heat.
Instead, both shade and sun are great
To help them thermoregulate.

Turtle, gecko,
Whiptail, skink,
Gila monster dressed in pink,
Caiman smile with teeth so white,
Reptiles of the world unite!

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Comments

  1. #1 Jen
    October 26, 2007

    Thanks to both you and the sprogs. I especially appreciate the use of the word thermoregulate, which is among my top 10 favorite words.

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