Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for October, 2008

Another generous donor (who prefers to remain anonymous) made a contribution to my challenge and requested some artwork from the sprogs. The requested subject matter, cats, is one about which the Free-Ride offspring are pretty enthusiastic (perhaps because I’m allergic to cats and can’t live with them). So, send in the cats:

My Oxbridge interview.

Drawing on the Guardian article on the sorts of interview questions being deployed by Oxford and Cambridge to “identify intellectual potential” in prospective undergraduates: How do you organise a successful revolution? And, given the present political climate, why don’t we let the managers of Ikea run the country instead of the politicians? As a university…

My better half was clearing plates from the kitchen table as I was cooking something. Dr. Free-Ride’s better half: Hey, I thought our kids like zucchini bread. Dr. Free-Ride: They do. That piece was [the kid across the street’s] — always gladly accepts a snack, never has more than a few bites. Dr. Free-Ride’s better…

What would the Blogger Challenge be without hand-drawn bar-graphs?

Garden update: day 89.

Nearly three months after we sowed the seeds in our raised garden beds, it feels like we’re on the edge of a change of seasons. The days are still quite warm (with temperatures in the mid-eighties for most of the past week), but the days are definitely cooler, and the hours or sunlight grow shorter…

At long last, we review a book to which we have alluded in at least two previous posts. The book: The Periodic Table: Elements with Style, written by Adrian Dingle, illustrated by Simon Basher. (Boston: Kingfisher, 2007)

Over at Effect Measure, Revere takes issue with a science educator’s hand-wringing over what science students (and scientists) don’t know. In a piece at The Scientist, James Williams (the science educator in question) writes: Graduates, from a range of science disciplines and from a variety of universities in Britain and around the world, have a…

The myth that will not die.

Dear Sarah Gardner and Marketplace producers, I listened with interest to your story on today’s show about the current prospects for the solar energy sector. While the story was engaging, I have a nit to pick.

This is a project in Brian Switek’s DonorsChoose Blogger Challenge, and if it doesn’t find full funding by the end of today, it’s not going to happen.

There’s an article in the 19 September 2008 issue of Science (“And Then There Was One”) [1] that catches up with many of the 30 men and women who made up the incoming class of 1991 in the molecular biophysics and biochemistry (MB&B) Ph.D. program at Yale University. The article raises lots of interesting questions,…