Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for January, 2009

One less fish by Kim Michelle Toft and Allan Sheather Watertown, MA: Charlesbridge Publishing 1998 Within the past week, each of the two Free-Ride offspring picked up this book, read it all the way through, and said to me, “You should write about this for the Friday Sprog Blog.” Instead of replying, “No, you should…

On my way to ScienceOnline’09

Once again, I’m sitting in my favorite airport with free wifi, bound this time for Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, for ScienceOnline’09. The conference has grown to feature two days of official sessions, plus a third day of semi-official goings on, and the place will be lousy with blogospheric glitterati. I’m going to be leading…

Around these parts, folks sometimes get het up about issues like scientific literacy (or lack thereof) in the general public, public interest (or lack thereof) in matters scientific, and whether scientists have the chops to communicate information clearly to non-scientists. It’s worth remembering that a large group of non-scientists are kids, and that they are…

While the ScienceBlogs upgrade was underway, a shiny new Bloggingheads diavlog was posted, featuring yours truly and PalMD. Mostly we talked about medical ethics, with some time spent on ethical issues around research with human subjects.

And … we’re back!

To celebrate the successful (!!) upgrade of ScienceBlogs to MT4, here is a dragon: Thanks, as always, for your patience.

You’ve probably already gotten the news that ScienceBlogs is getting a backend upgrade to MT4 this weekend. While this is going on (from Friday 1 PM Eastern until sometime Saturday, we hope), you’ll still be able to read the ScienceBlogs posts that are already up, but Sb bloggers won’t be able to publish new posts…

You know what makes an already scary world a lot scarier? When a government decides it’s a crime for disease researchers to do their job. From Declan Butler: Iran has summarily tried two of the nation’s HIV researchers with communicating with an “enemy government,” in a half-day trial that started and ended on 31 December…

During a recent bath, the younger Free-Ride offspring shared some deep thoughts: Younger offspring: There’s always life, even though every living thing dies. Dr. Free-Ride: Oh? Younger offspring: But life still continues because the Earth never explodes. Elder offspring: (from the hallway) Not so far.

Anesthesiology and addiction.

There’s an interesting story on The New Republic website at the moment, “Going Under” by Jason Zengerle, that relates the sad story of a young anesthesiologist’s descent into addiction. What I find interesting about it is the larger questions it raises about why this particular anesthesiologist’s story is not so unusual. Indeed, the article offers…

Or is it the kind of thing those other people do? In the car yesterday, I caught a story on Marketplace that was looking for insight into why people on Wall Street cheat. In the piece, host Kai Ryssdal interviewed Duke University behavioral economist Dan Ariely about research conducted (with college students, of course) on…