Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for March, 2009

Framing and ethics (part 3).

In a pair of earlier posts, I looked at the ethical principles Matthew C. Nisbet says should be guiding the framing of science and at examples Nisbet discusses of ethical and unethical framing. Here, consider some lessons we might learn from the framing wars. I’m hopeful that we can gain insight about the folks interested…

Mythical Pet Shop.

As promised, a picture from the elder Free-Ride offspring: There’s a sale on Chinese dragons and hypogryffs! I don’t know if it’s related to the economic downturn, though.

Framing and ethics (part 2).

In my last post, I looked at a set of ethical principles Matt Nisbet asserts should be guiding the framing of science. In this post, I consider the examples Matt provides as the “DO” and “DON’T” pictures for the application of these guiding ethical principles. First, Matt examines an example of framing done well:

Framing and ethics (part 1).

If it’s spring, it must be time for another round of posts trying to get clear on the framing strategies advocated by Matthew C. Nisbet, and on why these communications seem to be so controversial among scientists and science bloggers. My past attempts to figure out what’s up with framing can be found here: Movie…

And sometimes it happens right across the street from my favorite aquarium. With a smack that’s slightly squishy. Sea Notes provides the details:

It would appear that our rainy season is really over until next winter (which is not to say that it won’t rain at all between now and then, just that things will be more dry than wet). So, it seemed like a good time to document some recent developments in the Free-Ride garden. Today, I’m…

links for 2009-03-29

Generating Ideas vs. Harshing Your Mellow « Off Our Pedestals LiveJournal as many-to-many communication where "big blogs" are one-to-many (and what that does to the dynamics of the conversation). (tags: blogosphere communication) Social Science Research News: Guest Post Friday – Coercion in Research Maybe requiring Psych 101 students to participate in research projects isn’t such…

When, speaking to journalists about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa, you make a claim that the epidemic is: a tragedy that cannot be overcome by money alone, that cannot be overcome through the distribution of condoms, which can even increase the problem those listening who assume you are committed to honesty (because of that commandment…

Well, the school science fair looms (as school science fairs are wont to do). While the actual event isn’t until May, we have reached the point at which the science teacher is vetting the proposed projects.

links for 2009-03-27

A Natural Scientist: In Which All’s Well That Ends Well (At Work) 1. Get it in writing! 2. If you didn’t get it in writing, be stubborn! (tags: work lab-life women-in-science) The Junction Potential: Electrophysiology isn’t a technique you add to your CV; it’s a state of being! "Not a bad idea actually; screw those…