Adventures in Ethics and Science

This morning’s conditions were more of the same — overcast and dry.

There were no gastropods in evidence.


Maybe this speaks to the success of our weed-clearing and morning snail- and slug-picking. Maybe there’s a pocket of them I haven’t located yet, busily breeding and plotting their revenge.

Or maybe the other yards suddenly look more attractive to the gastropods than mine does. Although given the free exchange of birds, squirrels, cats, and ants across property lines, I can’t imagine that gastropods would be respectful of such boundaries.

Today’s take: no slugs or snails. However, I did find a stink bug. As it turned up on my laminated card of common California insects that are harmful to gardens, I cast it into the Soapy Bucket of Merciful Deliverance.

Comments

  1. #1 Bob O'H
    June 1, 2009

    I can’t imagine that gastropods would be respectful of such boundaries.

    Perhaps not, but they don’t move very fast. Someone in Switzerland found that you can increase their migration rate along roads by cutting the grass: they get moved when it’s stacked up.

  2. #2 blf
    June 1, 2009

    Wonderful. Now it’s invisible flying waterproof-superflue-sliming salt-resistent intelligent large fast amphibious sapper gastropods the mad scientist is selecting for.