Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for November, 2009

There is a story posted at ProPublica (and co-published with the Chicago Tribune) that examines a particular psychiatrist who was paid by a pharmaceutical company to travel around the U.S. to promote one of that company’s antipsychotic drugs. Meanwhile, the psychiatrist was writing thousands of prescriptions for that same antipsychotic drug for his patients on…

Random YouTubery video-tainment.

It’s been a long day, between teaching and attending to committee work, giving a colloquium talk, dealing with an emergency drill, and coming home to make a later-than-planned dinner for the kids (since my better half had to help a sprog with an arithmetic emergency during the anticipated dinner hour). Tomorrow is a day off…

Because, as it happens, I tend to notice patterns in student papers, then end up musing on them rather than, you know, buckling down and just working through the stack of papers that needs grading. In my philosophy of science class, I have my students write short essays (approximately 400 words) about central ideas in…

Snapshots from our weekend.

Remember how I mentioned that we had some soccer tournaments this weekend? Well, it looks like we’re going to need a bigger shelf.

Continuing internet education.

Yo dawg! This is a soccer tournament weekend for the Free-Rides. (First game: 8:00 AM. Time of departure from Casa Free-Ride: 6:30 AM. Zombification complete!) At the moment, the younger offspring and I are chilling before the younger offspring’s team’s second game; the younger offspring is watching Fred videos, while I am filling in gaps…

At Terra Sigillata, Abel notes that the Director of Duke University’s Catholic Center is butting in to researchers’ attempts to recruit participants for their research. As it happens, that research involves human sexuality and attitudes toward sex toys. Here’s how Abel lays it out: Father Joe Vetter, director of Duke University’s Catholic Center, is protesting…

A bit of follow-up on the two experiments we described last week: First off, the water cycle model.

Dr. Free-Ride: I wanted to ask you guys a question. I think maybe I asked you this question (or something like it) some time ago, but you were a lot younger and, you know, you keep growing and changing and stuff. So the question is, when someone tells you something about science, how can you…

Including this question which, apparently, led a popular search engine to direct someone to this very blog: Is philosophy tested on animals? No. No, it isn’t. (Actually, it’s not clear to me that all of it is tested on humans, either.)

At Bioephemera, Jessica Palmer notes a disturbing double standard: [T]here’s a huge double standard in the media, and in society in general, when it comes to drug abuse treatment. I spent two years as a AAAS Fellow at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and it was both depressing and inspiring: I was deeply impressed…