Adventures in Ethics and Science

Archives for February, 2010

Although I swear that the Free-Ride offspring have not read the relevant prior posts! While walking home from school: Younger offspring: From now on, in the sprog blogs, can you call me “the small, silent one”? Dr. Free-Ride: Why? You’re neither small nor silent. Elder offspring: Definitely not silent. I live with you, I know.

The panel discussion took place, as planned, on the evening of Tuesday, February 16, 2010 at UCLA. The hall was well-populated, if not completely packed, with members of the UCLA community. (Honestly, for week 7 of a 10-week quarter, during a spell of lovely weather, I’m impressed they had such a high turnout of students.)…

On the post where I asked you what made you feel welcome to comment on blogs and polled you on what would make you unlikely to comment on a post, friend of the blog Eva notes in a comment: One of the bloggers at nature network is currently polling (silent) readers about what makes them…

Collegiality matters.

Abel has a thoughtful post on the horrific faculty meeting shooting at University of Alabama Huntsville this past Friday. New information seems to come out every few hours on the shooter, Dr. Amy Bishop, a biologist at the university who had been denied tenure, and I’m nowhere near ready to weigh in on the particulars…

Dr. Isis considers a downside to having coauthors and an ethical question it raises:

I’m not looking for a general theory of what sets up the right room for dialogue as opposed to an argument, nor even for a fine grained analysis of whether dialogue or argument is what most blog readers and commenters are looking for. If you’re reading this post, I’m interested in knowing what you prefer.…

Matthew C. Nisbet put up a post today titled The Right Room for a Dialogue: New Policy on Anonymous Comments . In it, he writes: I’ve long questioned the value of anonymous blogging or commenting. Much of the incivility online can be attributed to anonymity. And with a rare few exceptions, if you can’t participate…

On account of Valentine’s Day being right around the corner, and inspired by Sheril’s almost-through-the-edits book on the science of kissing, I thought I’d ask the Free-Ride offspring (now 8.5 and 10.5 years old) whether they had any questions about kissing that they thought science might be able to answer. Their initial reaction:

Following DrugMonkey’s lead, I’m going to play along on the meme proposed by Female Science Professor: What tradition or other general characteristic of academia would you like to see eliminated completely? According to the rules, which I just invented, the things to be eliminated have to be of a general nature. So, for example, the…

Blogiversary addendum.

Earlier today, I had this conversation with my better half. Dr. Free-Ride’s better half: (with a look of deep concern) So, I saw something in your post today. Dr. Free-Ride: Oh? (Wondering if a heinous typo got through cursory attempts at editing)