Diversity in science

Adventures in Ethics and Science

Category archives for Diversity in science

Session description: We will introduce programs that attract wider audiences to science, math, and engineering at various institutions/education levels, programs that mentor students (high school, undergrad & grad students) in research and education excellence. How Social Media tools can be used to raise the profile of and build support networks for under-represented scientists and engineers.…

Coming up with a good definition is hard. And it’s not obvious that people are even really talking about the same thing when they identify an action or a situation as displaying civility or incivility. So I’m wondering what kind of insight we can get by looking at some particular situations and deciding which side…

Yesterday Dr. Isis put up a post that seems to have bugged many of the people who subsequently posted comments on it. I have no idea whether the commenters on the post intended to convey it, but here’s what’s coming across to me as a reader of the exchange:

As promised, in this post I consider the treatment of the science-religion culture wars in Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens Our Future by Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum. If you’re just tuning in, you may want to pause to read my review of the book, or to peruse my thoughts on issues the book…

A modest proposal.

Dr. Isis offers advice to a reader who gets ogled by a professor. Numerous commenters chime in with their own experiences of being ogled, groped, and otherwise harassed by professors, classmates, bosses, colleagues, and random guys.

Dr. Isis has some rollicking good discussions going on at her pad about who might care about blogs, and what role they might play in scientific education, training, and interactions. (Part one, part two.) On the second of these posts, a comment from Pascale lodged itself in my brain: I think a lot of impressionable…

Maria Mitchell and the Sexing of Science: An Astronomer among the American Romantics by RenĂ©e Bergland Boston: Beacon Press 2008 What is it like to be a woman scientist? In a society where being a woman is somehow a distinct experience from being an ordinary human being, the answer to this question can be complicated.…

First about those carnivals:

(Written for the inaugural edition of the Diversity in Science blog carnival, with big thanks to DNLee for launching it.) Back in the spring and autumn of 1992, I was a chemistry graduate student starting to believe that I might actually get enough of my experiments to work to get my Ph.D. As such, I…