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Adventures in Ethics and Science

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There are two features of games that have always appealed to me. First, the good ones put you in a place where you are explicitly thinking out different ways the future could play out — the possibilities that are more or less likely given what you know (and what you don’t know). Second, many of…

As promised, I bring you some gift recommendations for kids who are into math or science (or could be if presented with the right point of entry). The first installation: books. Books are the best. They don’t need batteries or assembly. They don’t have lots of little parts that will end up strewn on the…

In a comment on the last post, zwa asks: I’m curious about your vegetarianism (as one myself) and whether your kids are. If yes, did they choose it, if no did you try to convince them? My kids are vegetarians, and have been since birth — so they didn’t choose it. I have imposed it…

Alternatives to faculty jobs.

I’m revisiting a topic I posted about half a year ago: once you have a Ph.D., what are your job options beyond a faculty job or a research position? The last post was more about what one could do with a science major or masters degree. It didn’t necessarily exclude non-standard things to do with…

From time to time I get emails asking for advice dealing with situations that just don’t feel right. Recently, I’ve been asked about the following sort of situation: You’re an undergraduate who has landed an internship in a lab that does research in the field you’re hoping to pursue in graduate school. As so often…

Loyal ScienceBlogs reader Dr. Kim D. Gainer is moving to a newly-renovated office (Yay!) that is smaller than her current office — which means that some of the goodies on her bookshelves are in need of new homes. That’s where you come in. She writes: If folks would like any of these books, they should…

Occasionally I get email asking for advice in matters around responsible conduct of research. Some readers have related horror stories of research supervisors who grabbed their ideas, protocols, and plans for future experiments, either to give them to another student or postdoc in the lab, or to take for themselves — with no acknowledgment whatever…

This post, originally posted 8 January 2006 on the old site, responds to an email I got after the last post. Given John’s recent post on Pro-Test, the questions are still timely. * * * * * I received an email from a reader in response to my last post on PETA’s exposing of problems…

Months ago, I wrote about the Department of Homeland Security’s concerns about chemistry sets. (You know, for kids.) Well, it seems the push to make the world child-safe (or perhaps not legally actionable?) continues. Reader Donn Young points me to this story from Wired about government crackdowns on companies catering to garage chemistry enthusiasts. Donn…

There’s a lot going on in our world that might make you want to gnash your teeth. Some of that stuff, which you’ve heard about here before, involves the government trying to exert an influence over science — either in what research gets supported (and who makes that decision) or in how the results of…