Minds and/or brains

Adventures in Ethics and Science

Category archives for Minds and/or brains

Younger offspring: Mom? I have a question. Dr. Free-Ride: OK. Younger offspring: If I got up really early – Dr. Free-Ride: I hope you won’t.

I’ve just gotten back from a conference, and I was blaming the travel and time zones for the fact that I feel like this: However, from the looks of things, it seems there is some kind of zombie epidemic on ScienceBlogs today. (I suppose this means I need to talk to the IT guys about…

Is multitasking unethical?

In a recent column at Business Week, Bruce Weinstein (aka “The Ethics Guy”) argues that multitasking is unethical. He writes of his own technologically assisted slide into doing too many tasks at once: I noticed that the more things I could do with ease on my computer, the harder it was to focus on any…

Earlier this week, Ed Yong posted an interesting discussion about psychological research that suggests people have a moral thermostat, keeping them from behaving too badly — or too well:

Can you go home for the holidays?

Having filed grades and extricated myself from the demands of my job, at least temporarily, I have come with my better half and offspring to the stomping grounds of my better half’s youth. Well, kind of.

In the 20/27 December 2007 issue of Nature, there’s a fascinating commentary by Cambridge University neuroscientists Barbara Sahakian and Sharon Morein-Zamir. Entitled “Professor’s little helper,” this commentary explores, among other things, how “cognitive-enhancing drugs” are starting to find their way into the lifestyles of professors and students on university campuses, a development which raises some…

Another episode in the continuing saga, “Janet is a tremendous Luddite.” Back when I was “between Ph.D.s” one of the things I did so I could pay rent was work as an SAT-prep tutor. The company I worked for didn’t do classroom presentations to a group of students, but rather sent us out on “house…

In the May 18th issue of Science, there’s a nice review by Paul Bloom and Deena Skolnick Weisberg [1] of the literature from developmental psychology that bears on the question of why adults in the U.S. are stubbornly resistant to certain scientific ideas. Regular readers will guess that part of my interest in this research…