Numeracy and innumeracy

Adventures in Ethics and Science

Category archives for Numeracy and innumeracy

There’s a neat article [1] in the September-October 2008 issue of American Scientist (although sadly, this particular article seems not to be online) in which Brian Hayes discusses the Monty Hall problem and people’s strong resistance to the official solution to it. Now, folks like Jason have discussed the actual puzzle about probabilities in great…

Today Chad has an interesting post about attitudes among academics toward math and science versus the humanities and arts. The general attitude Chad sees on display in his academic milieu is that a gappy knowledge of art history or music or literature is something to be embarrassed about, but when it comes to innumeracy or…

Some screechy monkey or other tagged me on the song chart meme. The idea seems to be to come up with a visual/graphical representation of a song or some lyrical subset of it. In other words, you can get your music-geek and your math-geek on at the same time. I came very close to going…

Tradition takes its toll

The tradition in the Free-Ride family (passed down from my family) is that, on Christmas morning, no one gets to start opening presents until everyone is awake and ready to start opening presents. It doesn’t matter how early the kids are awake. Until the last sleepy parent is ready, you just have to wait. Santa…

Dave Munger pointed me to an article in the New York Times that claims “switching to a plant-based diet does more to curb global warming than switching from an S.U.V. to a Camry.” Dave is a critical consumer of information and notes that there is little given in this particular article (which appears in the…

On my last post, Kristine commented: My favorite “finals week activity” was defending to two students why they couldn’t take the lab exams three weeks after all of their classmates took it, just because they realized now that they never showed up for class that week. Whew. Ten minutes each, and as emotionally draining as…

The math limerick.

A real nerd can combine love of math and poetry, like so: {(12+144+20+3(4)^0.5)/7}+5(11) = 81 + 0 It’s a true equation. And, it’s a limerick. Read it out loud and you’ll see:

Sadly, this makes me think more kids should have been watching M&M commercials in December of 1999. As reported by the Gainesville Sun: Proofreaders at the University of Florida appear to have failed the Pepsi challenge. UF has called off a massive giveaway of Gator T-shirts, paid for by Pepsi, upon realizing that Roman numerals…