Shameless self-promotion

Adventures in Ethics and Science

Category archives for Shameless self-promotion

… especially if you’ve just lost an hour to an unseasonably early Daylight Savings (can I blame the groundhog for this?), here are some attractive time sinks:

My humble haiku, Clobbered in the poll — Unless You vote, intervene. Voting closes February 26, 11:59 PM EST — so act now! (If you want to be sure you’re voting for mine, I reproduce them below the fold.)

Jim Gibbon has opened voting on his academic haiku contest. I urge you to check out all the 17-syllable distillations of scholarly works, but especially those in the physical sciences category. Two of those haikus are mine. (Technically, one of them ought to be in the humanities category, but I can see how an exploration…

I’ve written my talk!

As some of you will have noticed, I’m scheduled to give a talk at the 2007 North Carolina Science Blogging Conference in just under two weeks. This morning, I finished (kind of) working out that talk. A few things worth noting:

When academics IM …

… Page 3.14 shares the transcript. Go read what we said when Ben Cohen and I shot the cyberbreeze about Karl Popper and the allure he holds for scientists. I can’t promise it will leave you ROTFLYAO, but it might make you TTFN.

If you’re ready to admit that we’re almost done with 2006 and that it might be OK to start making plans for 2007, check your calendar and think about coming to the 2007 North Carolina Science Blogging Conference, a “free, open and public event for scientists, educators, students, journalists, bloggers and anyone interested in discussing…

This is going to look like I’m tooting my own horn again, but actually I’m tooting for Concerned Scientist Daniel Rhoads on this one. Meme Therapy has another installment in their “brain parade” series. In this one, they ask: We’re seeing renewed attacks on evolution, certain branches of scientitic research and conspiracy theories involving climatologists…

How is our vision of the world affected by the possibilities we see explored in science fiction? Meme Therapy asked a bunch of science fiction writers (and some philosopher of science), and got some interesting answers about reading and writing, grappling with conflicting messages, questioning authority, and being worried. Go read it.

Plagiarism and Podcasts.

Do you ever feel like hearing me rattle on instead of just reading it? Here’s your chance! You can listen to the first episode of the ScienceBlogs podcast, in which I speak with Katherine Sharpe about the evils of plagiarism (among other misdeeds) in the world of science.

The polls for 2005 Koufax Awards are now open! There are 15 award categories, and a good representation of science bloggers (including ScienceBlogsers) among the nominees. Including (aw, shucks!) “Adventures in Ethics and Science” in the Best New Blog category. Of course, I would be honored if you were to vote for me! (Voting this…