evolgen

This is a Good-bye Post

This is the final post ever at evolgen. It was a fun 4+ years, the last three spent at ScienceBlogs, but it has come time for me to close up shop. When I first got into blogging, I did it as a way to share what was on my mind to the few people who…

Mendel’s Garden is the original genetics blog carnival. The next edition will be hosted by Jeremy at Another Blasted Weblog. If you would like to submit a blog post to be included in the carnival, send an email to Jeremy (jcherfas at mac dot com). The carnival should be posted within the next few days,…

Eric Lander Teaches?

John Hawks points out that Eric Lander has been appointed to co-chair Obama’s Council of Advisers on Science and Technology along with science adviser John Holdren and Nobel Laureate Harold Varmus. Here’s how the AP article describes Lander: Lander, who teaches at both MIT and Harvard, founded the Whitehead Institute-MIT Center for Genome Research in…

A couple of years ago, there was talk in the bioblogosphere about getting the general public interested in bioinformatics and molecular evolution: Amateur bioinformatics? Lowering the Ivory Tower with Molecular Evolution Molecular Evolution for the Masses The idea was inspired by the findings of armchair astronomers — people who have no professional training, but make…

Do people still use microarrays?

Larry Moran points to a couple of posts critical of microarrays (The Problem with Microarrays): Why microarray study conclusions are so often wrong Three reasons to distrust microarray results Microarrays are small chips that are covered with short stretches of single stranded DNA. People hybridize DNA from some source to the microarray, which lights up…

All those types of speciation

Over at Wilkins’ cabana, there’s a post (Some new work on speciation and species) on a paper by Nitin Phadnis and Allen Orr (doi:10.1126/science.1163934). Phadnis and Orr isolated a gene responsible for both reproductive isolation and sex-ratio distortion between two populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura. Wilkins doesn’t like speciation genes, and he’s rails on the concept…

Call for Mendel’s Garden #26 Submissions

The 26th edition of Mendel’s Garden will be hosted by A Free Man on December 7. If you have written a blog post about any topics in Genetics in the past month or so, send a link to Chris (chris[at]afreeman[dot]org) to be included in the carnival. We’re also looking for hosts for upcoming editions. If…

Genome Sequenced, Published via Press Release

Back in the day, you could sequence a genome and get a Nature paper out of it. Pretty soon, the sexiness of genome sequencing wore off, and it took a bit more to get into a vanity journal. You had to sequence something cute and cuddly, something extinct, or a lot of genomes at once.…

Is Nested Clade Analysis Worthwhile?

Population biologists often want to infer the demographic history of the species they study. This includes identifying population subdivision, expansion, and bottlenecks. Genetic data sampled from multiple individuals can often be applied to study population structure. When phylogenetic methods are used to link evolutionary relationships to geography, the approaches fall under the guise of phylogeography.…

Genes in the Post-Genomic Era

You would think that geneticists would have a good definition of “gene”. After all, genes are what we study. In introductory biology courses, you may have been introduced to the concept of the gene as the unit of heredity. That’s all well and good, but when you begin to study genes at a molecular level…