evolgen

Archives for January, 2006

Best Biology Experiment/Discovery

Chad at Uncertain Principles, one of my ScienceBlogs siblings, is requesting his co-bloggers suggest the most important experiment or discovery in their field. There are a disproportionate amount of “bio-bloggers” — though we each have our own niche — and he’s asking us to nominate “the most important experiment or observation in biology”. I’m expecting…

Limitations in Evolutionary Genetics

PZ Myers is reposting some of his greatest hits from the old Pharyngula website to his new digs at ScienceBlogs. In one post he gets into the deficiencies of modern evolutionary theory using West-Eberhard’s book as a guide. I agree with most of the thing he says (and I’ll get into how I agree with…

Posting Format

I’m still getting used to the Movable Type interface that ScienceBlogs is using (it’s a bit different than Blogger), and some of the changes may be noticible to you, my readers. For one, I’ve been dividing my posts into the “Entry Body” (which you can read on the evolgen front page) and the “Extended Entry”…

I Changed My Mind

I previously remarked that I would be posting my series “Detecting Natural Selection” over at the old site. Well, as the title of this post indicates, I changed my mind. The newest installment of “Detecting Natural Selection” has been posted at ScienceBlogs.

Detecting Natural Selection (Part 7)

Nucleotide Polymorphism and Selection This is the seventh of multiple postings I plan to write about detecting natural selection using molecular data (ie, DNA sequences). The introduction can be found here. The first post described the organization of the genome, and the second described the organization of genes. The third post described codon based models…

Say It Ain’t So, Paul

Paul Nurse, president of Rockefeller University, has a commentary (I believe it requires a subscription) in this week’s issue of Cell. Within his essay he lays out some of the impediments to biomedical research in America. He starts by explaining current funding problems and suggests that smaller research groups may be able to deal with…

Are Deletions Deleterious? Part 3

I have been describing some recently published worked on polymorphic deletions (see here and here for the previous two posts) on the old site. I will conclude that series here at ScienceBlogs with a discussion of linkage disequilibrium and deletions. In the previous two posts I outlined two different approaches for identifying polymorphic deletions using…

Microbial Diversity

Apparently, not much known about the genetic diversity of bacterial populations — or so I’ve heard. As a eukaryotic geneticist, I can say that we know a whole bunch about multicellular organisms — mostly because they’re a lot easier to see and catch, and they’re more like us than are prokaryotic relatives. A paper in…

Welcome to evolgen at ScienceBlogs

Hello again to my long time evolgen readers, and nice to meet you to the first timers who have found the new site. For my regular readers, this, for all intents and purposes, is the new evolgen. The old site is still around and will act as an archive of my previous evolgen posts, but…