evolgen

Bora has been pushing the idea of publishing original research (hypotheses, data, etc) on science blogs. As a responsible researcher, I would need to obtain permission from any collaborators (including my advisor) before published anything we have been working on together. But what about small side projects or minor findings that I don’t expect to publish elsewhere? As it turns out, such a project has been laying dormant since I first started working on it at a class project a few years ago. I will reveal more information about this project in subsequent posts, but suffice it to say this research is far from earth shattering. My primary objective is not to present any important findings, but rather to give my readers insight into how easy it is to study evolution. After reading this series (I hope) someone will be able to download some sequences from the NCBI database and perform their own analyses. That being the case, all of the software I use will be freely available and easy to run on a PC (sorry Mac users, but that’s my environment of choice).

Comments

  1. #1 coturnix
    April 24, 2006

    Cool! Can’t wait.

  2. #2 Bruce Thompson
    April 24, 2006

    Those of us with the software can replicate your findings and perhaps bring additional insights. Additional sets of eyes might see other goodies in your data, anyway data mining is fun. Dembski likes to use the internet for peer review and many people were happy to critique his work, volumes were written about his papers and research. Real science would be much more interesting to discuss and much more informative.

  3. #3 RPM
    April 24, 2006

    I’m not aspiring to be Bill Dembski. This will be more about education than crappy science.

  4. #4 Bruce Thompson
    April 24, 2006

    I think others have already beaten you that post, they are the et. al. at Uncommon Decent.

  5. #5 coturnix
    April 25, 2006

    BTW, there is a bloggable article by Nicholas Wade in today’s NYTimes on chromatin, conserved sequences of non-coding DNA, and cell-fate.

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