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Archives for July, 2006

For Your Sunday Viewing Pleasure

Via Genetics and Health comes this cartoon movie of DNA replication. If you’ve never taken a molecular genetics course, this may be new to you.

A Few Links for Your Sunday

Here is some light reading for your Sunday: Mosquitoes sing to each other by flapping their wings. This paper reports sexually dimorphic responses to wing beat patterns in mosquitoes (PZ Myers has a good review). This leads me to wonder whether we can study intra- and inter-specific differences in flight behavior and response, which then…

Who (or What) Deserves Protection?

At one point in my life, I wanted to study conservation genetics. Now, I just make fun of molecular ecologists and their flawed data. The most recent installment of Ask A ScienceBlogger takes me back to the days before I discovered the wonders of genomics: Is every species of living thing on the planet equally…

The Future of 454

The Scientist is linking to an imaginary1 article from PNAS in which researchers compare the cost of sequencing microbial (I’m guessing they mean bacteria) genomes using the traditional Sanger method and the hot new technology developed by 454. Not so surprisingly, they find that a hybrid method — ~5x coverage with Sanger followed by a…

More Uses for the “-ome” Suffix

The genome encodes all of the RNAs and contains sequences responsible for the transcription of those RNAs and the proper folding and wrapping of the cromosomes. The RNAs encoded by the genome are collectively known as the transcriptome. The transcripts that are translated into proteins represent the proteome or the ORFeome (depending on the context).…

Dolly is 10 Years Old

I’ve missed the last two Ask A ScienceBlogger questions. My lack of answers were due to a combination of being busy and apathy toward the questions — more busy with the science education question and apathy for the science policy question. But this week’s question is on cloning, so I kind of feel obligate to…

Hsien Lei is continuing her interview series at Genetics and Health. Interview #6 is with Psychologist Deborah Serani. When asked how genetics figured into her education, Dr. Serani replied: My family was very science-based given that my dad was a Chiropractor. I have a hard time following her logic. You’d think being “science-based” would steer…

We’re #28!!!!

The Nature Genetics blog, Free Association, links to evolgen (at the old URL — update your links dudes). We’ve pointed this out before. It’s nothing new. Now Nature, the big dog of science publishers, is ranking science blogs. Here is the story. Pee Zed is numero uno (big surprise), but the entire list is heavy…

France is Hell Bent for Leather

France’s diminutive goalkeeper Fabien Barthez and Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford:

Empty DNA

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is one of the most used markers in molecular ecology1. A good molecular marker for population level studies should be neutral, so that researchers can use it to infer things like: Population size and changes in population size (expansions and bottlenecks); Population structure; And phylogeographic relationships. A recent meta-analysis of mtDNA polymorphism…