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Archives for January, 2007

Circus of the Spineless #17

Jeremy has posted the newest edition of the Circus of the Spineless — the blog carnival dedicated to invertebrates — at the Voltage Gate. We’ll excuse the carnival organizers for creating a carnival organized around a paraphyletic taxon this one time because Jeremy included one of our posts on wasps. He’s also got stuff on…

Of Genes and Species

I straddle the line between being a population biologist and a molecular geneticist. That’s a self-congratulatory way of saying that I am an expert in neither field. But existing in the state I do allows me to observe commonalities shared by both. For example, both fields have terminology (or what the uninitiated would call jargon)…

Week of Science Challenge — One Week Away

The Week of Science Challenge (official website here) begins next Monday (5 February 2007). During the time of the challenge, all participating bloggers will post at least once per day on science and only science — no anti science or non-science material. If you would like to participate, you can sign up here by providing…

We’ve got Phil Skell, and we can’t get rid of him. Both Michael Behe and William Harris have rolled through my parts in the past few years. Tonight we get disciples of Adnan Oktar (Harun Yahya), the muslim creationist described in this article on creationism in Turkey. He’s also an alleged holocaust denier. When I…

Wilkins Replies

Wilkins has replied to my post on species concepts. The gist: there are a bunch of species concepts, many of which are pretty darn good. My reply: that’s awesome as long as they guide future research. The BSC provides a framework for studying reproductive isolation. Ecological species concepts are useful when studying adaptation to niches.…

Species Concepts are Dynamic . . . and Crap

Because I haven’t riled up Wilkins in a while. I was chatting with a friend who has published a fairly high profile article on speciation about species concepts. We came to the conclusion that species concepts are useless unless they guide future research. Okay, we were just echoing Coyne ‘n Orr. As crappy as the…

The Motherboard Has Landed

I got my motherboard replaced a couple of hours ago, so I now have my old forms of procrastination at my disposal — blogging and blog reading. I’ve got one link for you that is relevant to Gregg Easterbrook’s anti-multi-author screed. This one comes from BioCurious; it’s an article on attributing credit in multi-author papers.…

Mendel’s Garden & Other Announcements

Three things: A new edition of Mendel’s Garden has been posted at Neurotopia. Go read the latest genetics blogging. The anecdote at the beginning of my rant about elevator usage needs a slight correction: I think the grad student who took the elevator down has a bum knee (it’s a new injury). I’m not too…

On the Use of Elevators in Research Buildings

Allow me to set the stage. I just emerged from the autoclave room with a cart full of hot, steamy, dirty vials and bottles of Drosophila media in tow (see image below the fold). The glassware had been the home for thousands of flies for a period of over a month. What started out as…

Esquire runs a regular article called “Answer Fella” in which stupid questions get stupid answers. In this month’s edition we find out whether cloned humans have souls, why South Dakota’s badlands are called badlands, and how many potatoes make up a bag of chips. My favorite answer, however, is to the question of what happens…