evolgen

Archives for March, 2007

This post is part of a series documenting Professor Steve Steve‘s recent visit to Philadelphia for the Drosophila Research Conference (aka, the Fly Meeting). Professor Steve Steve had a wild Saturday night. He was quite happy to have met leaders in the fields of evo-devo, population genetics, and genomics. Of course, Steve Steve is a…

Bracketology

It’s March, and you know what that means: brackets. There are two ScienceBlogs brackets to keep your eye on: The barkers at the World’s Fair have put together a Science Showdown — bracket style — broken into four regions: Octopus (life sciences), Mortar and Pestle (chemistry), Chair (philosophy and science studies), and Orbit (physics). Showdowns…

454 is so Last Week

It seems like only yesterday (okay, less than two years ago) that I learned about 454 sequencing. It’s the new technology that many folks think will replace dye termination Sanger sequencing using capillary arrays (the method used to sequence the human genome and many other genomes). A new technology is coming on the scene which…

This post is part of a series documenting Professor Steve Steve‘s recent visit to Philadelphia for the Drosophila Research Conference (aka, the Fly Meeting). In the previous two installments of Steve Steve in Philly, we finally managed to meet up despite the best efforts of the staff at the Marriott to prevent our rendezvous, and…

The title pretty much says it all. Go here to sign up.

Nicholas Wade’s Parasites

The New York Times has published an article in their Science section on the evolution of human parasites, and it’s not by Carl Zimmer. In the article, Nicholas Wade (another good science writer at the NYTimes) presents a few vignettes of human-parasite co-evolution, including a bacterium that causes tooth decay, the ulcer causing Heliobacter, and…

This post is part of a series documenting Professor Steve Steve‘s recent visit to Philadelphia for the Drosophila Research Conference (aka, the Fly Meeting). After tracking down Steve Steve in the lobby of the hotel on Saturday, we picked up some food at the Reading Terminal Market — a permanent sort-of-farmers-market next to the Philly…

What a weekend! Professor Steve Steve and I returned from Philadelphia on Sunday after hanging out with the Drosophilists. Steve arrived in Philly on Thursday morning on a direct flight from Iowa City, but the staff at the Philadelphia Marriott couldn’t understand his thick accent when he asked that they notify me of his arrival.…

Driving Around Town, Shopping for Fabric

Alex claims I do cowboy science because my protocol for DNA isolation requires cutting plastic with hot razor blades. But before we ever get to cut any plastic, we need to grind up the flies. I don’t have any pretty pictures of this process, but I can capture the essence in words (picture may come…

A discussion of open access data using bird flu and other disease data as examples. The recent scares over bird flu have led many researchers to investigate the epidemiology, genetics, and disease risks of the virus. The researchers are focused on both preventing the transmission of the virus into human populations and preparing for a…