evolgen

Archives for April, 2007

Giant Squids, Other Squids, and Manatees

Dr. Doris Haggis-on-Whey and her husband Benny, as part of their H-O-W series of books, have produced an absolutely dispensable piece of misinformation, the third in a series of we can only hope not too many, ineloquently titled Animals of the Ocean: In Particular the Giant Squid. They claim that their World of Unbelievable Brilliance…

A Post on Sex Chromosomes

A few articles have come out recently dealing with sex chromosomes in a variety of taxa. Here are some links to those articles, in list form: Given all we know about vertebrate sex chromosomes, it’s surprising that we don’t know how sex determination works in many fish, including the pufferfish Takifugu rubripes. That’s especially surprising…

In a round-up of some of the coverage of Shelley’s run-in with Wiley, Scientific American’s Nikhil Swaminathan wrote the following: Anyway, on Tuesday, over at the ScienceBlog Retrospectacle, neuroscience PhD student Shelley Batts (who based on her pictures alone seems to be both attractive and avian-friendly) posted an analysis of a study appearing in the…

Genetics of Speciation

The most recent issue of the Journal of Heredity contains a bunch of articles from a symposium on the “Genetics of Speciation” organized by Loren Rieseberg. Included in the collection is an article by Allen Orr and two of his students on speciation in Drosophila, which discusses mapping speciation genes, the role of meiotic drive…

Phylogeny Friday – 27 April 2007

This week’s phylogeny comes from this paper on molecular dating of speciation events. I won’t be addressing molecular dating per se, but I will be dealing with what molecular clocks tell us. Like, do they actually reveal the speciation time of a pair of species?

Around the Bioblogosphere

Ever wonder what biobloggers are blogging about on their blogs? Here’s what: Razib posts part of a paper by Jerry Coyne and others (which I can’t seem to track down) which questions the role cis regulatory elements play in adaptive phenotypic evolution. This all part of Coyne’s war on evo-devo. Another post at GNXP (this…

Junk in the Media

The recent Scientific American article on junk DNA (discussed here) has instigated a quite a furor in the bioblogosphere. Here is a collection of links: ERV linked with a tone of disgust. I restated my frustration with the term junk DNA. JR Minkel, the author of the Scientific American article, responded to my criticisms. Ryan…

Junk DNA in Scientific American

Would I write about junk DNA? No. Never. Not me. Not even when Scientific American publishes sub par articles on junk DNA. Well, they’re at it again. The most recent junk DNA article describes a study by Gill Bejerano of Stanford University which I can’t find published anywhere (neither can ERV). Is Scientific American describing…

Links Dumped

Because my browser consists of a growing forest of tabs containing stuff waiting to be blogged, and there is no way I can write a complete entry on each one, and I want to at least link to the relevant sites so that I can close those tabs, I give you a link dump with…

A Rube Goldberg Machine….

…that appears to do absolutely nothing (link). Usually they do something mundane in a really complex manner. But all this one does is open the curtains so that the credits can run. The device pictured below is different from the one linked above, but I figured this post needed something to fill up more space.…