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Archives for April, 2007

More Macaque

As you’ve probably already heard, George Allen’s favorite primate has had its genome sequenced. I promised to blog on the article, but this is not the post. Instead, this post is to kvetch about the coverage of this story in the popular press. It’s another adventure in bad science reporting! Here are two examples of…

Science has published two papers on Tyrannosaurus rex proteins (are we in the golden age of dino molecular biology?). In one paper, the authors report that they extracted proteins from T. rex soft tissue that was preserved for millions of years. In the other paper, some of the same researchers write about how they used…

Phylogeny Friday – 13 April 2006

Today’s password is coevolution.

Epigenetics does not Refute Darwin

According to Physorg.com, this study on epigenetic inheritance in chickens “shake[s] Darwin’s foundation”. Who knew inheritance in a flightless bird could induce an earthquake in northern Australia? That’s not what they’re referring to? They’re not claiming that a neo-Lamarckian process could produce seismic activity? For everyone running around like a chicken with its head cut…

In addition to the paper on adaptive evolution in the Drosophila melanogaster genome (reviewed here yesterday), Chung-I Wu is also senior author on a sort-of companion paper studying adaptive evolution in the human genome. Yeah, I know, who really cares about the human genome, human evolution, or humans? The real interest is in Drosophila. But,…

He’s With the Tralfamadorians Now

Because everyone else is commenting on it, I must as well. After all, I’d jump off of a bridge if everyone else were doing it. I don’t read science fiction. Sure, I’ve read a couple of the classics (ie, Ender’s Game). And I was really into Stephen King for a couple of years, starting in…

Good Biology

Sex chromosomes are cool. Because they’re cool, I’ve written about them before. It’s cool to trace the origins of sex chromosomes. It’s cool to study how they evolve. And it’s cool to compare similarities and differences of sex chromosomes within and between taxa. In organisms that use sex chromosomes to determine sex (eg, mammals, Drosophila,…

If it’s not human, it’s crap!

Those of us who work on non-human systems often grumble about the total disregard human geneticists (that’s geneticists who study humans, not humans who are geneticists) have toward non-human research (that’s research on non-humans, not non-humans doing research). I get the feeling that plant biologists have the same attitude toward non-plant researchers, and I imagine…

Tangled Bank #77

Tara has posted a brand new Tangled Bank at Aetiology. Head on over to her place for the best science blogging of the past two weeks.

Hitching a Ride on a Drosophila Genome

Not all regions of the genome are equal in the eyes of evolution. For example, natural selection is more effective on genes in regions of higher recombination. We have known this for a while. The connection between recombination rate and natural selection was nicely refined when it was shown that DNA polymorphism is lower in…