evolgen

Archives for September, 2007

Sex in the Fourth Dimension

Most of us are so used to the male+female=baby system of reproduction that we practice that it doesn’t even occur to us that there are other options. Sure, there’s the occasional instance of parthenogenesis in some megafaunal species, but that seems like the exception rather than the norm. And we do recognize that a lot…

Publishing Original Research on Blogs – Part 1

This is a repost (with some edits) of an introduction to publishing original research on blogs — a series I am reintroducing. The original entry can be found here. In April of last year, Bora pushed the idea of publishing original research (hypotheses, data, etc) on science blogs. As a responsible researcher, I would need…

Francisco Ayala is a Macro-phyle

Or is he micro-phobe? Nature Genetics has published a mostly positive review of the new Evolution textbook by Nick Barton and others (the others include blogger Jonathan Eisen) The review is penned by Francisco Ayala. Among the things Ayala brings up is the coverage various taxa receive: Surprisingly, however, five of the nine chapters of…

Tangled Bank #89

The newest edition of Tangled Bank has been posted by Martin at Aardvarchaeology. Go read yourself some science!

Multicellular Eukaryotic Genomes are Teh Suck

The human genome is one big, bloated motherfucker. It’s almost all non-protein-coding DNA. The same is true for many other eukaryotic genomes. Sure, some of it has a function. But a whole lot of it (and maybe most of it) is just junk. There are some who point to a relationship between genome size and…

Over a year ago I threatened to perform some original research and publish it on my blog. I got as far as writing an introduction to the project, but I never actually posted any data. I know, I suck.I had hoped to make the project simple enough that people could follow along. The problem was…

Carl Zimmer has a post covering three recent papers on gene duplication: one on amylase variation in humans, one on whole genome duplication in yeast, and one on duplications of genes in the Drosophila arizonae reproductive tract. In all three papers, results are presented showing the importance of duplicated genes in adapting to the environment.…

Family Values

I’m sure by now you’ve heard of the ginormous spider web that was spun in Texas. The thing was huge — 200 yards long — and it was spun by multiple different species. That interspecific collaboration got Bill Poser thinking, so he blogged about it at Language Log: The web covers hundreds of square meters.…

Wheel Bugs

As I was making my way back from a seminar on skin color genetics yesterday, I noticed a couple of bugs perched on the outer wall of my building. This wouldn’t be a blog worthy moment, except that the bugs were huge . . . and in mid coitus. I hurried inside and ran upstairs…

Tangled Bank #88

Matt at the Behavioral Ecology Blog has posted the newest edition of the Tangled Bank, the original science blogging carnival.